For Philip Glass: Joshi / LeWitt / Close

11 January 2017 - 19 February 2017

close_lyle_smaller-245x300The Ackland Art Museum joins in celebrating the 80th birthday of leading American composer Philip Glass by presenting a special installation that recognizes the key role that visual art and artists have played in Glass’s life and work.

Seven diverse works of modern and contemporary art by Chuck Close, Deepak Joshi, and Sol LeWitt call attention to the way in which regularized processes can lead to visual effects of emotional power and complexity, a fitting tribute to Glass’s accomplishments as a composer.

In addition, the Ackland is presenting Chuck Close’s 1991 silk tapestry version of his portrait of Philip Glass, first realized in Close’s iconic 1969 photorealist painting. The tapestry has been generously lent by James Keith Brown (UNC ’84) and Eric Diefenbach.
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The exhibition For Philip Glass coincides with a ten-day festival of performances at Carolina Performing Arts (CPA).

A Listening Lounge installed in the Museum (February 8 to 19) enables Ackland visitors to experience the music of Philip Glass.

Upcoming Programs

ART FOR LUNCH
Peter Nisbet, the Ackland’s deputy director for curatorial affairs, on For Philip Glass
Wednesday, 8 February, 12:20 PM
RSVP here!

   2002-30   photo

Chuck Close, American, born 1940: Lyle, 2003; 149-color silkscreen. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ackland Fund, 2005.27.

Sol LeWitt, American, 1928-2007: Within a twenty inch square, using a black, hard crayon, draw ten thousand straight lines, of any length, at random, pl. 2 from the portfolio Work from Instructions, 1971; lithograph, no. 24/25. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ackland Fund, 77.21.1.

Deepak Joshi, Nepalese, born 1963: Chakrasamvara and Vajravarahi, 2000-2002; ground pigment with animal glue binder on linen. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ackland Fund, 2002.30.

Sol LeWitt, American, 1928-2007: Incomplete Open Cube 7-11, 1974; baked enamel on aluminum. Lent by the Weatherspoon Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Museum purchase with funds from the Benefactors Fund in honor of Editha Carpenter, 1987.