Kehinde Wiley and Glenn Ligon at the Ackland

In conjunction with Dr. John Bowles’ ARTH 287 and ARTH 387 classes, six works by contemporary African-American artists are on view now through Sunday, May 10th, in the Study Gallery on the second floor of the Ackland. Perhaps the most eye-popping in its resoluteness and arresting color is Idrissa Ndiaye, a study in oil on paper by Kehinde Wiley.

WileyUndoubtedly, Wiley is having a cultural moment: the 37-year-old artist is enjoying his first retrospective at the Brooklyn Museum, and numerous examples of his work can be spotted on the set of Fox’s breakout new show “Empire.” Figurative, dramatic, and bombastically colorful, his art has all the necessary ingredients to be readily accessible to modern audiences.

Yet despite its immediate vivacity, below the surface Wiley’s art is deeply confrontational. He deals directly with stereotypical conceptions of African and African-American identity, both in modern culture and the history of art. His works usually follow a similar formula: a black figure, dressed in modern street clothes, stands heroically against a sumptuously decorative background. The figure gazes directly down at the viewer with an air of impassiveness and regality as baroque ornamentation swirls around him. Continue reading

Picasso at the Ackland

Pablo Picasso once said, “I must keep on trying, just to keep the experiment going until I get tired of it all. Even if the last result is not necessarily the best, I stop when my interest in the problem wanes.”

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Perhaps it is this enthusiasm for experimentation that makes Picasso so infinitely intriguing to modern audiences. While most known for his pioneering Cubist works, Picasso’s full oeuvre reflects an extraordinary diversity of artistic styles. He was an artistic alchemist, continuously testing the possibilities of form, abstraction, composition, and color.

As an extension of the recent PICASSO^3 exhibition (2 Jan – 8 March 2015), which presented works from the collection of Julian H. Robertson Jr., the Ackland has put many works by Picasso from its own collection on view. Stretching over decades and media, these pieces invite comparison and conversation about this incredibly versatile artist. Continue reading