Thoughts on Museum Success V: Survival and Persistence

Originally published in the Ackland’s Member E-Newsletter of 23 December 2014, this is the fifth and final in a series of ruminations on how museums measure success.

Dear Ackland Members,

I write this just as the days are beginning to get longer again and the New Year is in sight — a good moment to think about survival and persistence, the theme of this last reflection on how to think about the success of art museums. The other installments on this topic are now all available on this blog.

Survival can, in itself, be a measure of success for an art museum, for two reasons. Continue reading

Thoughts on Museum Success IV: Ten Measures of the Ackland’s Success

Originally published in the Ackland’s Member E-Newsletter of 11 December 2014, this is the fourth in a series of ruminations on how museums measure success.

15101465249_fdeed13630_o_cropped2Dear Members,

By the numbers… As promised in the last Member E-News, this installment of my communications about measuring museum success focuses on statistics. I’ve selected a range of metrics, each with its own strong signal about how well the Ackland is doing. I’ve abstained from any commentary (every statistic can be qualified and questioned in some way!), preferring to let these figures send a straightforward, cumulative message.

At the moment, of course, we at the Ackland are especially aware of statistics about our Annual Fund and Membership renewal, and I want to take the opportunity to warmly thank those who have already made commitments and to urge generosity for those still considering! If you have not yet made your end-of-year gift, please do so now. Your support is essential in underpinning all of our successes.

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Thoughts on Museum Success III: Numbers We Are Thankful For

Originally published in the Ackland’s Member E-Newsletter of 25 November 2014—the Thanksgiving editionthis is the third in a series of ruminations on how museums measure success.

In my considerations of how art museums should measure success, it is surely time to think about directly statistical criteria. But I don’t want to distract from the joys of Thanksgiving with extensive reflections on this, so let me just give you an appetizer of the kind of impressive numbers I’ll address in the next Member E-News in two weeks:

  • The Ackland is currently on track to see a 10% increase this academic year in the number of students and faculty incorporating visits to the Museum into their coursework, compared with last year’s record of 11,121which itself was a 10% increase over the year before.

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Thoughts on Museum Success II: Loans and Collection Relevance

Originally published in the Ackland’s Member E-Newsletter of 13 November 2014, this is the second in a series of ruminations on how museums measure success.

As I sit down to write the second of these musings about museum success, I find myself in Manhattan preparing to visit an exhibition of portraits by Egon Schiele, to which the Ackland has lent its splendid drawing of a woman (right). Indeed, at the moment, Ackland works are in special exhibitions in Essen, Germany; Los Angeles; Princeton, New Jersey; Jackson, Mississippi; and elsewhere. On my desk in Chapel Hill is a letter from the Metropolitan Museum of Art asking to borrow what is perhaps our greatest painting: Valentin de Boulogne’s St. John the Evangelist (below), and I anticipate soon receiving a request to send our Cleopatra and the Peasant by Eugene Delacroix to Minneapolis and London.

Each of these loans is, of course, unique in its circumstances. Each is evaluated on its own merits. But in the aggregate, can we not see the level of loan activity as a rough measure of success? It reflects the extent to which the Ackland has built a collection that can resonate with the current interests of art publics in many different contexts. We preserve art for posterity, but we also want our collection to engage with contemporary concerns in as many ways as possible. Statistics on loan traffic can signal the current relevance of the collection (as can the number of times in any one Continue reading

Thoughts on Museum Success I: Museums Nurturing Artists

Originally published in the Ackland’s Member E-Newsletter of 3 November 2014, this is the first in a series of ruminations on how museums measure success.

Those who work in and around art museums often turn their minds to the thorny question: how do we measure our success? It is a challenging and stimulating question which can lead off into unexpected avenues. I thought I’d share with you some of my own brief ruminations on this question. I do hope that I hear from you with your comments and ideas on this. Feel free to e-mail me at peter.nisbet@unc.edu — I hope to report on interesting ideas. Collectively, we may come up with some good answers!

Let me begin with a simple anecdote. The very first exhibition of my professional career was a show of drawings by the radical and experimental German artist Joseph Beuys (1921-1986), an artist I deeply admire. The details of the show aren’t relevant here; I want to focus on a dinner party conversation shortly afterwards. I found myself seated next to a sculptor, who, without knowing who I was, spoke movingly and at length about how this exhibition had Continue reading

Glimpse into the Collection: Reading All Night Long

The Bookworm, 1920In honor of staying up way-way-way too late yet again to finish a book, I give you The Bookworm by Arthur Paunzen. Something about the enormous stacks of books crowding the figure just speaks to me. Also his complete disregard for the huge spider over his head. Now that I would likely notice.

I will endeavor to go to sleep earlier from now on, but I’m sure some book will inevitably keep me up.

Arthur Paunzen, Austrian, 1890-1940: The Bookworm, 1920; drypoint. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Burton Emmett Collection, 58.1.1774.

Glimpse into the Collection: Old Well in the Spring? (We say, “Yes!”)

Old Well

Edward Carrick, British, 1905-1998: “Christmas Greeting Card,” 1930; wood engraving. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Burton Emmett Collection, 58.1.2389.

Diane Davis is the project photographer for the Ackland Art Museum’s IMLS Digitization Project Grant. Since 2010, she has been producing master image files to digitally archive all of the Ackland’s collections. After having a commercial business in Charlotte for 25 years, she finds working on this important project a very satisfying extension of her career.

As each of us on the digitization team has discovered this print, we’ve imagined it was made in Chapel Hill and depicts the Old Well on UNC campus in the spring.

It seems equally fitting for Easter, with the little bunny in silhouette in the foreground, doesn’t it?  It took me a number of viewings to even notice that there is a second bunny in the middle of the “valley”. Perhaps that has to do with the fact that the viewers eye is compelled to travel in the circular spiral of this composition…full of new growth bursting from the grass to the tree tops. Continue reading

Glimpse into the Collection: “A Hint of Spring”

Dana Brand is part of the three-person team working to make digital images and metadata for all 17,000+ objects in the Ackland’s collection available to the public online. She’s a self-described “Army brat” who landed longest in Winston-Salem, NC, before coming to UNC-Chapel Hill for both her Bachelor’s (English and Media Studies) and Master’s (Information Science) degrees. Dana first got into digitization, and metadata in particular, as an intern at the Digital Production Center in Wilson Library while in graduate school. 

This small series of prints just lifts my spirits and I wanted to share!

Bleriot

Ghislain Bleriot, French, born 1951: “Herbal: Impatiens” (“Herbier: Impatientes”), n.d.; drypoint and sulfur tint, printed in color. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Joseph F. McCrindle Collection, 2010.3.50.

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Mapping Armin Landeck

Megan Williams is an intern in the Ackland Art Museum’s Education and Curatorial departments and an MS Library Science / MA Art History candidate at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Artists often turn to their city for creative inspiration. Sometimes they represent exactly what they see down to each minute detail, other times, they produce a barely recognizable impression. Some of the prints in the exhibition America Seen are images of real things and places that still exist today. While researching these prints, I was eager to find the locations depicted. Like photographs, prints can be used as historical records, and they are capable of showing us a vision of an unknown or forgotten past.

York Avenue, Sunday Morning

Armin Landeck, American, 1905-1984: “York Avenue, Sunday Morning,” 1939; drypoint. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
The Hunter and Cathy Allen Collection, 2013.21.26

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Spring has Sprung at the Ackland Museum Store

The Ackland Museum Store is fully stocked with new items for Easter and Spring. There are so many unique items – ranging from flowers in a can to bunny tattoos – there is something for every age! I couldn’t help but hum “Here Comes Peter Cottontail” as I explored the shop.

For the avid gardener and grill master, the store has an array of cookbooks that are perfect for spring and summer meals!  There are also many different seeds, tools, and pots to choose from to start your own garden.

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