Past Screenings

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Fall 2017: “Radiant Cinema: Light, Life, and Luminescence”

Organized by the Ackland Art Museum and the UNC-Chapel Hill Global Cinema Studies Program, with assistance from the Media Resources Center, part of UNC Libraries. Special thanks to the NC Latin American Film Festival and the Chapel Hill Film Society. This series is presented in connection with the Ackland Art Museum exhibition Flash of Light, Fog of War.

FREE with UNC One Card; $4 general public. All screenings held at 7:00 PM at the Varsity Theater, 123 East Franklin St., Downtown Chapel Hill.

Moonlight– Tuesday, 10 October
(USA, 2016, dir. Barry Jenkins)
R | 1h 51min
Introduced by Rick Warner, UNC English & Comparative Literature

The winner of three Academy Awards including Best Motion Picture of 2017, Moonlight chronicles defining chapters in the life of Chiron, a young black man growing up in a rough neighborhood of Miami. His journey to manhood is guided by the support and love of the community that helps raise him.

Kagemusha – Tuesday, 17 October
(Japan, 1980, dir. Akira Kurosawa)
PG | 2h 42min

A petty thief with an utter resemblance to a powerful samurai warlord is hired as the lord’s double. When the warlord dies, the thief is forced to impersonate him and finds it difficult to live up to his new role during turbulent times in the kingdom.

The Lure (Córki dancingu) – Monday, 30 October
(Poland, 2015, dir. Agnieszka Smoczynska)
Not Rated | 1h 32min
Introduced by Dylan Caskie, Chapel Hill Film Society

In Warsaw, a pair of mermaid sisters, who share a dream of swimming to America, are adopted by a musical family running a cabaret. While one of these sirens, “Silver,” seeks love and romance among humans, the other, “Golden,” has more bloodthirsty thoughts for the population of the city.

The Salt of the Earth – Tuesday, 7 November
(France/Brazil/Italy, documentary, 2014, dir. Juliano Ribeiro Salgado and Wim Wenders)
PG-13 | 1h 50min

For 40 years, photographer Sebastião Salgado has traveled across the world and witnessed some of the major events of our recent history, including civil wars, starvation, and mass immigrations. He is now exploring the world’s pristine territories, documenting wild fauna and flora and grand landscapes, as part of a massive photographic project as a tribute to the earth’s beauty.

Eyes Wide Shut – Tuesday, 28 November
(UK/USA, 1999, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
R | 2h 39min
Introduced by Rick Warner, UNC Dept. of English & Comparative Literature

A New York City doctor (Tom Cruise), married to an art curator (Nicole Kidman), pushes himself on a harrowing and dangerous night-long odyssey of sexual and moral discovery after his wife admits that she once almost cheated on him.

Fall 2016 – “POLITICS OF PLACE”

Presented by the Ackland Art Museum, UNC-Chapel Hill’s Global Cinema Studies Program, and the Media Resources Center at UNC.
All films screen at the Ackland Art Museum in the food- and drink-safe ART& space.

Films begin at 7:00 PM unless otherwise noted. Click film titles for descriptions.

selma1Selma
(dir. Ava DuVernay, 2014, U.S.)
Thursday, 1 September
Introduced by Michelle Robinson (UNC-Chapel Hill, American Studies).

Phoenix
(dir. Christian Petzold, 2014, Germany)
Thursday, 8 September
Introduced by Inga Pollmann (UNC-Chapel Hill, English & Comparative Literature).

The Second Mother (Que Horas Ela Volta?)
(dir. Anna Muylaert, 2015, Brazil)
Thursday, 15 September
Introduced by Sam Amago (UNC-Chapel Hill, Romance Studies)

In Jackson HeightsIn_Jackson_Heights_Still
(dir. Frederick Wiseman, 2015, US, documentary)
Thursday, 29 September, 6:00 PM
Introduced by Julia Haslett (UNC-Chapel Hill, Communication Studies).

Sonita
(dir. Rokhsareh Ghaemmaghami, 2015, Germany/Switzerland/Iran, documentary)
Thursday, 6 October
Introduced by Winifred Metz (UNC-Chapel Hill, Media Resources Center).

We Come as Friends
(dir. Hubert Sauper, 2014, Austria, documentary)Beasts-of-No-Nation
Thursday, 13 October
Introduced by Sabine Gruffat (UNC-Chapel Hill, Art).

Beasts of No Nation
(dir. Cary Joji Fukunaga, 2015, US)
Thursday, 27 October
Introduced by Gregg Flaxman (UNC-Chapel Hill, English & Comparative Literature).

Far from Men (Loin des hommes) 
(dir. David Oelhoffen, 2014, France)
Thursday, 3 Novembergarden of eden3
Introduced by Hassan Melehy (UNC-Chapel Hill, Romance Studies).

The Garden of Eden
(dir. Ran Tal, 2012, Israel, documentary)
Thursday, 10 November 
Introduced by Yaron Shemer (UNC-Chapel Hill, Asian Studies).

Cemetery of Splendor (Rak ti Khon Kean) 
(dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2015, Thailand)
Thursday, 17 November 
Introduced by Rick Warner (UNC-Chapel Hill, English & Comparative Literature).

Spring 2016

Join us this spring for a series of four screenings presented in connection with the Ackland’s current exhibition Walls of Color: The Murals of Hans HofmannThe selected films will explore Hofmann’s artistic world and the ways in which he also influenced the world of film.

All film screenings will be held in the Hanes Art Center Auditorium (Room 121) next to the Ackland, unless otherwise noted. Free and open to the public.

Hofmann Studio arms
Hans Hofmann: Artist/Teacher, Teacher/Artist (2003)

28 February 2016, 1:00-5:00 PM
Screened on the hour every hour (56 min). Presented in connection with Art of Teaching: A Day Celebrating Mentorship in the Arts.

Selected Films by Ken Jacobs, a former student of Hans Hofmann.
2 March 2016, 6:00 PM
Presented in connection with the 2016 CHAT Festival.

Painters Painting: The New York Art Scene 1940-1970 (Emile de Antonio, 1973)
8 March 2016, 6:00 PM

Talk and screening with Ken Jacobs, a former student of Hans Hofmann.
10 April 2016, 4:00 PM
This program begins in the Ackland’s galleries.

Fall 2015

Monday, 12 October, 7:00 PM
Longing (Valeska Grisebach, Germany, 2007)
Introduced by Inga Pollmann, Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures, Comparative Literature.
An average, everyday metalworker and volunteer firefighter content in his marriage to his childhood sweetheart finds his emotions unexpectedly stirred when he falls for a pretty waitress from a nearby town.

Tuesday, 13 October, 7:00 PM (part of NC Latin American Film Festival)
Yvy Maraey (Juan Carlos Valdivia, Bolivia, 2014)
Introduced by Samuel Amago (Romance Studies)
A filmmaker travels with a Guaraní guide from the highlands of La Paz to the swamps in the forests of southeastern Bolivia, documenting the daily lives and struggles of the indigenous people of the region.

Monday, 19 October, 7:00 PM
Lod Detour (Orna Raviv, Israel, 2009)
Introduced by Yaron Shemer (Asian Studies)
Lod Detour is the story of Ilan Hakaray, principal of the Amal High School in Lod, Israel, who offers students their last opportunity to complete a high school education after they fail out of other institutions. The film follows three students’ stories through their principal’s eyes, as he doggedly fights for them to succeed against all odds.

Tuesday, 27 October, 7:00 PM
War Photographer (Christian Frei, Switzerland, 2001)
Introduced by Julia Haslett (Communication Studies)
A film about the American photographer James Nachtwey, about his motivation, his fears, and his daily routine as a war photographer. Director and producer Christian Frei followed Nachtwey for two years into the wars in Indonesia, Kosovo, Palestine, and used special micro-cameras attached to James Nachtwey’s photo-camera. The result is the viewer being able to see a famous photographer looking for the decisive moment. We hear every breath of the photographer. For the first time in the history of movies about photographers, this technique allowed an authentic insight into the work of a concerned photo-journalist.

Monday, 9 November, 7:00 PM
Étranger de l’Intérieur – Stranger from Within (Sonja Bertucci, Serbia and Montenegro, 2014)
Q & A with the director follows the screening. Introduced by Gabriel Trop
After years of absence, filmmaker Sonja Bertucci returns to Kosovo, the birthplace of her Serbian mother, to come to terms with what has happened to a place that she knew from her childhood memories. She documents the remaining Serbian communities in this region grappling with a history marked by war, trauma, and poverty, and records her encounters with the Serbian Kosovars, their daily struggles and joys, their fears and their hopes, their memories and their outlook for the future.

Wednesday, 18 November, 7:00 PM
Meenaxi: A Tale of Three Cities (M.F. Hussain, India, 2004)
Introduced by Afroz Taj (Asian Studies)
This film centers on novelist Nawab, who is suffering from a serious case of writer’s block. After five years and no stories, Nawab comes across an unconventional muse, Meenaxi. The three cities referred to in the title are Hyderabad, Jaisalmer, and Prague. Directed by M.F. Hussain, widely known as “the Picasso of India, ” the film features an acclaimed score and soundtrack by A.R. Rahman.

Spring 2015

In connection with Genius and Grace: Francois Boucher and the Generation of 1700, the Ackland Film Forum presents Rated aRt: Risqué Films about Art in the Eighteenth Century.

Boucher D-F-800_300x300

Wednesday, 4 March:  Dangerous Liaisons (Stephen Frears, 1988)
Nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and winner of Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Costume Design, and Best Art Direction, Dangerous Liaisons follows the revengeful plot created by Marquise de Merteuil (Glenn Close) to end her ex-lover’s (John Malkovich) current relationship. Also starring Uma Thurman and Michelle Pfeiffer.

Friday, 6 March: Ridicule (Patrice Leconte, 1996)
Set at the decadent court of Versailles, where social status rose and fell based on one’s ability to mete out witty insults and avoid embarrassment, Ridicule looks at the decadence, corruption, and callousness of French aristocrats of the eighteenth century.

Tuesday, 10 March: Quills (Philip Kaufman, 2000)
Quills reimagines the last years of the Marquis de Sade (Geoffrey Rush), who has been sentenced to the Charenton Asylum for the Insane for his scandalous political commentary. Determined not to be silenced, he has his political machinations smuggled out for publication with the help of the asylum’s laundress, Madeleine LeClerc (Kate Winslet). Quills received three Oscar nominations and two Golden Globe nominations.

Wednesday, 11 March: The Draughtsman’s Contract (Peter Greenaway, 1982)
Mr. Neville, an arrogant young artist, is contracted by Mrs. Virginia Herbert to produce twelve drawings of her husband’s estate. But when Mr. Herbert’s body is found, Mr. Neville’s drawings prove to be worth more than originally thought. This murder mystery is was the recipient of the prestigious Grand Prix of the Belgian Film Critics Association.

Tuesday, 17 March: Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, 2006)
Written and directed by Sophia Coppola, this daring, highly-stylized period film looks at the life of the French queen (Kirsten Dunst) in the years leading up to the French Revolution. Coppola was given unprecedented access to the Palace of Versailles for the filming and chose New Wave and Post-Punk music for the soundtrack.

Fall 2014 – Photography in Cinema

9 September, 7:00 PM
Rear Window (Alfred Hitchcock, USA, 1954)
With an introduction by Henry Veggian (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature)

16 September, 7:00 PM
Blow Up (Michelangelo Antonioni, UK/Italy, 1966)
With an introduction by Hassan Melehy (UNC-Chapel Hill, Romance Languages)

30 September, 7:00 PM
La Jetée (Chris Marker, France, 1962) and Images of the World and the Inscription of War (Harun Farocki, West Germany, 1988)
With an introduction by Rick Warner (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature)

14 October, 7:00 PM
Memento (Christopher Nolan, USA, 2000)
With an introduction by Todd Taylor (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature)

21 October, 7:00 PM
City of God (Fernando Meirelles, Brazil, 2002)
With an introduction by Patricia Fuentes Lima (UNC-Chapel Hill, Romance Languages)

Spring 2014 – American Comedy, American Democracy (Part 2)

A series of films devoted to the ways that Hollywood cinema, particularly depression-era comedies, have depicted the problems and possibilities of democracy. Co-presented with the UNC Global Cinema Studies Program.

Thursday, 27 March, 7:00 PMshampoo_300

Shampoo (1975, dir. Hal Ashby)

This Academy award winning romantic comedy was released at the conclusion of the Watergate scandal and is set on the eve of Richard Nixon’s election in 1968. The film follows a successful Beverly Hills hairdresser George Roundy (Warren Beatty) on his journey for self-fulfillment. Roundy yearns to own his salon, but doesn’t have the funds to bring his dream to life. He tries to acquire money through his rich lover’s husband, Lester (Jack Warden), but his efforts get him caught in a dangerous web between his current girlfriend, Jill (Goldie Hawn), and ex-girlfriend, Jackie (Julie Christie).

This film will be introduced by Shayne Legassi (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature).

Tuesday, 15 April, 7:00 PM

To Be or Not to Be (1942, dir. Ernst Lubitsch)ToBeOrNotToBe

This screwball comedy follows a Polish theater company couple as they attempt to stay safe in Nazi Germany. In Carole Lombard’s last movie, she plays Maria Tura, wife of Joseph Tura (Jack Benny). The Turas find themselves battling to stop a traitor from revealing names of people in the underground. The theater group members then impersonate Nazi officers to ensure their safety and avoid spies. Though this comedy was controversial after its original release date during WWII, it later acquired acclaim.

This film will be introduced by Priscilla Layne (UNC-Chapel Hill, German).

Tuesday, 22 April, 7:00 PM

Nashville (1975, dir. Robert Altman)

Over five days leading up to a political rally for Replacement Party candidate Hal Phillip Walker, the lives of various people connected to Nashville’s music industry intersect. The myriad characters represent a cross-section of America in the wake of JFK’s assassination and under the shadow of the Vietnam war.

“American Comedy, American Democracy” is the inaugural William Nolan Cinema Series sponsored by the UNC Global Cinema Program, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, and the Department of English and Comparative Literature.

Swain Lot Film Festival

The annual juried series of short films by UNC student filmmakers in the Communication Studies Department.

Thursday, 1 May & 8 May

Festival Shorts, Parts 1 & 2

SPRING 2014

America’s Music Series

Tuesday, 25 February

The Blues and Gospel Music – Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues: “Feel Like Going Home” and Say Amen, Somebody
Post-film discussion with Chris Reali (PhD candidate in musicology, UNC-Chapel Hill).

Thursday, 27 February

Broadway and Tin Pan Alley
Broadway: The American Musical: “Syncopated City”
Post-film discussion with Tim Carter (David G. Frey Distinguished Professor of Music, UNC-Chapel Hill)

Tuesday, 4 March

Swing Jazz
The International Sweethearts of Rhythm and Ken Burns’ Jazz: “Swing, The Velocity of Celebration”
Post-film discussion with Chris Wells (PhD candidate in musicology, UNC-Chapel Hill).

Tuesday, 18 March

Country and Bluegrass – High Lonesome: The Story of Bluegrass

Post-film discussion with Jocelyn Neal (Professor of Music and Adjunct Professor of American Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill).

Thursday, 20 March

Rock – The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll: “Plugging In”

Post-film discussion with John Brackett (Lecturer in Music, UNC-Chapel Hill).

Tuesday, 25 March

Latin Rhythms from Mambo to Hip Hop

Latin Music USA: “Bridges”
From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale

Post-film discussion with David Font-Navarrete (Postdoctoral Fellow, Duke University).

The Ackland Art Museum is thrilled to take part in “America’s Music,” a project of the Tribeca Film Institute in partnership with The American Library Association Public Programs Office, Tribeca Flashpoint, and The Society for American Music. Made possible by a major grant from The National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.AM_boilerplate

 

American Comedy, American Democracy (Part 1)

A series of films devoted to the ways that Hollywood cinema, particularly depression-era comedies, have depicted the problems and possibilities of democracy. Co-presented with the UNC Global Cinema Studies Program.

Tuesday, 21 Januaryallpres2_
All the President’s Men (1976, dir. Alan J. Pakula)

This Academy Award-winning political thriller stars Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman as Washington Post journalists who exposed the Watergate scandal. While researching a story about a botched 1972 burglary of Democratic Party headquarters at the Watergate apartment complex, reporters―and rivals—Woodward (Redford) and Bernstein (Hoffman) stumble on a possible connection between the burglars and a White House staffer. With their editor’s approval, the pair digs deeper, getting help from a guilt-ridden turncoat bookkeeper and the essential if cryptic guidance of Woodward’s mystery source, Deep Throat. Woodward and Bernstein continue to “follow the money” all the way to the top of the Nixon administration.

This film will be introduced by Rick Warner (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature).

Tuesday, 4 February (Rescheduled from 28 Jan)
sullivans travels_300Sullivan’s Travels (1941, dir. Preston Sturges)

Joel McCrea stars as John L. Sullivan, a popular comedic director, who yearns to do something different and create a socially relevant drama based on the novel O Brother, Where Art Thou? This 1941 satire follows Sullivan as he pretends to be a hobo to chase his dream. Along the way, Sullivan meets a failed actress, played by Veronica Lake, who becomes his travelling companion. Sullivan experiences many road bumps on his journey, but eventually realizes that he needs comedy in his life.

This film will be introduced by John McGowan (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature).

Thursday, 6 February 
Duck Soup (1933, dir. Leo McCarey)
duck-soup_300

In this Marx Brothers comedy, Groucho Marx’s character, the dictator of Freedonia, goes to war with Sylvania over his love of the rich Mrs. Teasdale. The Sylvanian ambassador Trentino attempts to obtain Freedonia’s war plans by sending in spies “Pinky” (Harpo Marx) and “Chicolini” (Chico Marx). Upon official declaration of war, the cast breaks into chaotic song and dance, as only the Marx brothers could do.

This film will be introduced by John McGowan (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature).

Tuesday, 18 February (Rescheduled from 13 Feb)
Ruggles of Red Gap (1935, dir. Leo McCarey)

“Ruggles of Red Gap” first gained popularity as a serial in 1914 in The Saturday Evening Post, which was followed by a novel and a Broadway musical in 1915. It transitioned to film in 1935 and follows an English butler’s quest for independence in the American West. After being mistaken for a wealthy English gentlemen, Ruggles becomes a small town celebrity in Red Gap, Washington, and his new identity gives him the courage to become his own man.

This film will be introduced by Gregg Flaxman (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature).

Thursday, 20 Februarymrsmith
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, dir. Frank Capra)

This Academy Award-winning political comedy-drama follows Jefferson Smith, played by James Stewart, as he attempts to make a name for himself after being appointed to fill a seat in the Senate. Smith’s naivety lands him on the front of the Washington Press labeling him a “bumpkin,” and he is taken under the wing of Senator Joseph Paine (Claude Rains). Paine encourages him to propose a bill, but is secretly entrapping Smith in the middle of politically corrupt scheme.

This film will be introduced by Inga Pollman (UNC-Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature).

“American Comedy, American Democracy” is the inaugural William Nolan Cinema Series sponsored by the UNC Global Cinema Program, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, and the Department of English and Comparative Literature.

Fall 2013

The Art of Bollywood

A series exploring the art of Bollywood filmmaking—and the art-making that appears in Bollywood films.

Inspired by the filmmaking work of prominent Indian artist M.F. Husain, this series centers on films that show how the worlds of visual art and filmmaking intersect and can serve as inspiration for one another. The Art of Bollywood film series is presented in connection with The Sahmat Collective: Art and Activism in India since 1989, an exhibition of art and ephemera from the Indian activist artist collective Sahmat. The exhibition includes works by many artists who fiercely defended M.F. Husain as he was forced into voluntary exile from India towards the end of his life.

Co-Curated by Afroz Taj (UNC-CH, Asian Studies), John Caldwell (UNC-CH, Asian Studies), and Allison Portnow (Ackland Art Museum).

Dil Chahta HaiTuesday, 15 October, 7:00 PM
Dil Chahta Hai (Farhan Akhtar, 2001)
Set in modern Mumbai, this coming-of-age comedy-drama follows the lives of three young men–Akash, Sameer, and Sid–in their romantic (and sometimes not-so-romantic) adventures. The world of art permeates the film in a number of ways, including visits to exhibitions and operas, as well as a romance between Sid, a painter, and an older woman and art-lover. This “new wave” Bollywood film has a mix of traditional song-and-dance elements, as well as more contemporary musical numbers. In Hindi w/ English subtitles. 185 min.

Tuesday, 22 October, 7:00 PM
Geet Gaya Patharon Ne (V. Shantaram, 1964)
In this classic Bollywood film, a young man (Vijay) descended from a long line of temple sculptors refuses to practice this craft until he becomes inspired by the sight of a woman (Vidya) for whom he falls. Vijay convinces Vidya to run away to marry him in spite of his poverty, but the couple encounter many obstacles and their tale ends in heartbreak. In Hindi w/ English subtitles. 162 min.

Mughal-e AzamThursday, 24 October, 7:00 PM
Mughal-e Azam (K. Asif, 1960)
Considered one of the great classical epic films of Bollywood, Mughal-e Azam set the standard for many Bollywood films to follow. The story follows Prince Salim as he falls in love with a court dancer and rebels against his father, the Emperor Akbar. The artistry of the film is shown through the handcrafted costumes and jewelry made by top artisans, the careful attention to historical detail, and the highly regarded soundtrack inspired by Indian classical and folk music. In Hindi w/ English subtitles. 177 min.

Tuesday, 29 October, 7:00 PM
Harishchandrachi Factory (Paresh Mokashi, 2009)
In celebration of the 100th anniversary of birth of Indian filmmaking, we screen Harishchandrachi Factory, a fictional depiction of the making of Raja Harishchandra, India’s first feature film, in 1913. In telling the story of the director’s struggles with making the first Indian film, Harishchandrachi Factory employs many of the same cinematic techniques that were used for the first film, including a fixed camera angles and shaky, experimental zooming in certain shots. In Marathi w/ English subtitles. 106 min.

Learn more about The Sahmat Collective: Art and Activism in India since 1989 and the other public programs being offered in connection with this exhibition.

Spring 2013

17 January: The Pruitt Igoe Myth (Chad Freidrichs, 2011)
The Pruitt-Igoe Myth is an award-winning documentary that tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home. Presented in connection with Playmakers Repertory Company‘s productions of A Raisin in the Sun and Clybourne Park (26 Jan – 3 Mar 2013). *This is a free screening.*

24 January: Flag Wars (Linda Goode Bryant & Laura Poitras, 2003)
Shot over a four-year period, Linda Goode Bryant and Laura Poitras’ Flag Wars is a poignant and very personal look at a community in Columbus, Ohio, undergoing gentrification. What happens when gay white homebuyers move into a working-class black neighborhood? Winner of the Jury Award at the South by Southwest Film Festival, Flag Wars is a candid, unvarnished portrait of privilege, poverty and local politics taking place across America. Presented in connection with Playmakers Repertory Company‘s productions of A Raisin in the Sun and Clybourne Park (26 Jan – 3 Mar 2013). *This is a free screening.*

31 January: Turkey’s Tigers (John Alpert & Matthew O’Neill, 2005)
Turkey sits at a cultural and geographic crossroads where the Eastern and Western worlds meet. Historically a devoutly Muslim country, Turkey — from the volatile eastern Kurdish region near the Iraqi border, to the industrial central region of Anatolia, to the world-class city of Istanbul — is today anything but homogeneous. This documentary explores the complexities of Turkish culture and adds another dimension to the “Cinema of the Global Middle East” series begun last semester at the Ackland Film Forum. Sponsored by Art/Islam, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, amd the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies. *This is a free screening.*

5 Feb: When the Drum is Beating (Whitney Dow, 2011)
In Haiti, there is one band that’s seen it all: Septentrional. For six decades, this 20-piece band has been making beautiful music–a fusion of Cuban big band and Haitian vodou beats–that turns out thousands of fans each time it plays. At the age of 62, Septentrional has already survived 12 years longer than the expected Haitian lifespan. Led by 80-year-old ‘Maestro’ Ulrich Pierre Louis, its trumpeters, drummers, sax players, and guitarists have played through dictatorships, natural disasters, coup d’états, and chaos, navigating the ups and downs of Haiti’s history. The band embodies a particular Haitian trait: the ability to find beauty in places of darkness. How did the country go from being the first free black republic with a huge wealth of natural resources to a shattered nation unable to support its citizens? How did the hope created by the rise of Jean Bertrand Aristide and the despair that followed the coup that drove him from power contribute to the inevitability of the January 2010 earthquake’s horrific death toll? The passion, commitment, dreams, and joy of Septentrional’s musicians reveal the indomitable Haitian spirit. With a sweeping narrative and infectious music, this is the story of not just one band’s survival, but also Haiti’s survival. Presented by the Institute for the Study of the Americas in celebration of Black History Month.

12 Feb, 7 PM: Los Chigualeros (Alex Schlenker, 2009)
Los Chigualeros celebrates the music of one of Ecuador’s most famous orchestras. Chigualeros, founded almost three decades ago, fuses different sound like son, marimba, guaracha, currulao, bolero, and the chigualo. Like many parts of Latin America, Ecuador has an African history that is evoked through the mix of sounds in the music of Chigualeros. The film presents the lives of the orchestra members while also exploring topics of deforestation and environmental degradation in the region. Spanish with English subtitles. Presented by the Institute for the Study of the Americas in celebration of Black History Month.

21 February, 7 PM: Untitled (Jim Hodges, Carlos Marques da Cruz, & Encke King, 2010)
Untitled is a non-linear montage of archival and pop footage recalling the passionate activism sparked by the early years of the AIDS crisis. Un-spooling at multiple levels, the narrative flies between scenes of tragic brutality to kitschy humor, arch clips of laughter and ironic surprises while shredding traditional chronology. Many references — the title, short excerpts from Golden Girls and Dynasty, popular songs, and contemporary issues — nod towards the work of artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres, whose art served as the impetus for the Ackland’s exhibition More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s (on view 1 Feb – 31 Mar 2013). *This is a free screening.*

28 February, 7 PM: A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)
Set in contemporary Iran, A Separation is a compelling drama about the dissolution of a marriage. Simin wants to leave Iran with her husband Nader and daughter Termeh. Simin sues for divorce when Nader refuses to leave behind his Alzheimer-suffering father. Her request having failed, Simin returns to her parents’ home, but Termeh decides to stay with Nader. When Nader hires a young woman to assist with his father in his wife’s absence, he hopes that his life will return to a normal state. However, when he discovers that the new maid has been lying to him, he realizes that there is more on the line than just his marriage. Presented as part of the “Cinema of the Global Middle East” series and sponsored by Art/Islam, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies. *This is a free screening.*

7 March, 7 PM: Me and You and Everyone We Know (Miranda July, 2005)
This film tells the story of Christine Jesperson, a lonely artist and “Eldercab” driver, who uses her fantastical artistic visions to draw her aspirations and objects of desire closer to her. Richard Swersey (John Hawkes), a newly single shoe salesman and father of two boys, is prepared for amazing things to happen. But when he meets Christine, he panics. Life is not so oblique for Richard’s seven-year-old Robby, who is having a risqué internet romance with a stranger, and his fourteen- year-old brother Peter who becomes the guinea pig for neighborhood girls— practicing for their future of romance and marriage. In July’s modern world, the mundane is transcendent and everyday people become radiant characters who speak their innermost thoughts, act on secret impulses, and experience truthful human moments that at times approach the surreal. They seek together-ness through tortured routes and find redemption in small moments that connect them to someone else on earth. Presented by the Ackland in connection with the exhibition More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s (on view 1 Feb – 31 Mar 2013), which also features the work of July.

21 March, 7 PM: Pariah (Dee Rees, 2011)
A world premiere at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival, the contemporary drama Pariah is the feature-length expansion of writer/director Dee Rees’ award-winning 2007 short film Pariah17-year-old Alike (pronounced Ah-Lee-Kay) lives with her parents Audrey and Arthur (Kim Wayans and Charles Parnell) and younger sister Sharonda (Sahra Mellesse) in Brooklyn’s Fort Greene neighborhood. She is quietly but firmly embracing her identity as a lesbian. Wondering how much she can confide in her family, Alike strives to get through adolescence with grace, humor, and tenacity – sometimes succeeding, sometimes not, but always moving forward. Presented by the Carolina Women’s Center as part of its 2013 Gender Week programming, which has the theme “Mapping the Margins.”

28 March, 7 PM: Films of Yoko Ono: “Fly” (1970) and “No. 4 (Bottoms)” (1966)
In connection with its exhibition More Love, the Ackland Art Museum will screen two 16mm experimental films by Yoko Ono, whose work is also featured in the exhibition. In Ono’s 20-minute film “Fly,” the camera follows a housefly as it walks around on a nude female body, as Ono’s song “Fly” provides the soundtrack to the film. In her film “No. 4” (also known as “Bottoms”), Ono conducts an eighty-minute filmic experiment consisting entirely of close-up shots of famous people’s bottoms in an attempt to make a statement about world peace.

2 April (Tuesday), 7 PM: The Manchurian Candidate (John Frankenheimer, 1962) and Pull My Daisy (Robert Frank & Alfred Leslie, 1959)
The first night of a three day celebration of the work of composer, musician, poet, and author David Amram, two films featuring the work of Amram will be screened: the well-known 1962 political drama The Manchurian Candidate, featuring an original score by Amram, and the lesser-known 1959 short film written by Jack Kerouac, Pull My Daisy, which features Amram on screen as well as his original score. Amram will be present for Q+A following the film. Related events will occur in the next few days on campus and in the community. April 3, 5 PM: A reception for David Amram at the Ackland Art Museum followed by a talk at 5:45 PM at Hyde Hall on UNC’s camus. April 4, at 7 PM: A performance at the Carrboro Arts Center.

9 April (Tuesday), 7 PM: Cairo 678 (Mohamed Diab, 2010)
Three Cairene women from different backgrounds join together in uneasy solidarity to combat the sexual harassment that has impacted each of their lives. We begin on an overcrowded bus line, dreaded by Fayza as a daily site of humiliation and anguish. Responding to a self-defense talk by Seba, whose own assault has driven her marriage apart, Fayza fights back—and soon has a police detective searching for her amid public panic. Meanwhile, Nelly, an aspiring comic, faces pressure from family to drop a lawsuit against her attacker. Mohamed Diab’s deftly braided narrative tells a gripping, timely social tale through its patchwork of interconnected lives and deeds. Presented as the final film of the “Cinema of the Global Middle East” series and sponsored by Art/Islam, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, and the Media Resources Center at UNC-Chapel Hill. Co-presented by the Global Film Institute. *This is a free screening.*

18 April, 7 PM: Las Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo and the Search for Identity (C. A. Tuggle, 2011)
This film tells the story of Las Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, an Argentinian human rights organization of grandmothers committed to finding their lost grandchildren, who they believe were stolen by their country’s government some 30 years ago. At least 10,000 — and some estimate as many as 30,000 — dissidents of the military dictatorship were kidnapped, tortured, and killed during Argentina’s Dirty War from 1976-1983. Those kidnapped became known as Los Desaparecidos or “the disappeared.” Some of the women were pregnant or new mothers when captured, and infants ended up in homes of people sympathetic to the regime. The babies’ names, birth dates and other identifiers were changed. Las Abuelas has located more than 100 missing grandchildren, many who had no knowledge of their true identities.

23 April (Tuesday), 7 PM: I Have Always Been a Dreamer (Sabine Gruffat, 2012)
I Have Always Been A Dreamer, by filmmaker and UNC-Chapel Hill faculty member Sabine Gruffat (Art Dept), is an essay film about globalization and urban ecology using the examples of two cities in contrasting states of development: Dubai, UAE and Detroit, U.S.A. Within the context of a boom and bust economy, the film questions the collective ideologies that shape the physical landscape and impact local communities. Though these cities represent two different economic eras (Fordist and Post-Fordist), both cities vividly illustrate the effects of economic monocultures and the arbitrary consequences of geopolitical advantage. The film serves as a visual documentation of these two cities as indexes of political, cultural and economic change while tracing the ways each city’s development is tied to technologies of communication, production, labor, and consumption.

2 May, 7:00 PM: Swain Lot Film Festival: Festival Shorts, Part 1
Part one of two in the annual festival of student films at UNC, now in its second year of partnership with the Ackland Film Forum. These screenings will feature a juried show of the best works produced in 2012-13 by the media production students in the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Liking ABBA Made Me Gay – Jim Bulluck, Scott Donnell – 7:44
Flying – Erica O’Brien – 0:49
Make Games, Not War – Dane Keil – 9:02
Father Time – Daniela Madriz – 3:15
Safe House – Kyle Rainey – 14:48
To Make The Moon Rise – Hannah Eck – 4:45
Expect – Peter Vance – 2:58
 
INTERMISSION
 
House Pets – Aaron Medina – 4:27
Gnar Carolina – Brady Lawrence – 3:31
Adoption – Caleb Goodnight – 8:21
Lucid – Jordan Graham – 6:03
Alpacas and Destiny – Jordan Imbery – 15:00

9 May, 7:00 PM: Swain Lot Film Festival: Festival Shorts, Part 2
Part two of two in the annual festival of student films at UNC, now in its second year of partnership with the Ackland Film Forum. These screenings will feature a juried show of the best works produced in 2012-13 by the media production students in the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Framed – Lawrence Brady and Justin Ellis – 5:41
Tom is Dead – Ethan Henderson – 18:00
Sotto Voce – Katie Stover – 1:23
This Man, My Brother – Erik Peterson – 14:00
Good Deed – Kyree Tittle – 1:31
Pet – Rachel Garner – 3:00
 
INTERMISSION
 
Humans Yelling Like Goats – Charlie Harris – 2:29
The Brandsons – Rebecca Burnett and Tamara Gavric – 9:00
I am Positive – Grace Farson – 3:05
June – Justin Ellis – 3:48
The Still Point – Paul J.F. Davis – 19:00

FALL 2012

Wednesday, 12 September, 7:00 PM: Cedars in the Pines: The Lebanese in North Carolina (Akram Khater and Danica Cullinan, 2011)
Cedars in the Pines is a documentary about the 120-year history of Lebanese immigrants in North Carolina. Interviews with first, second, and third generation Lebanese Americans convey individual and family experiences of departure, struggle, opportunity, and community and, at the same time, raise broadly relevant questions about the immigrant experience in terms of maintaining culture and the relationship between identity and place. Filmmaker Akram Khater will be present for Q & A following the screening. This is the first of three films presented in the series “Cinema of the Global Middle East,” sponsored by Art/Islam, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies. *Note: Admission to this screening is free.

Thursday, 20 September, 7:00 PM: The Harvest | La Cosecha (U. Roberto Romano, 2011)
Every year there are more than 400,000 American children who are torn away from their friends, schools and homes to pick the food we all eat. Zulema, Perla, and Victor labor as migrant farm workers, sacrificing their own childhoods to help their families survive. The Harvest | La Cosechaprofiles these three as they journey from the scorching heat of Texas’s onion fields to the winter snows of the Michigan apple orchards and back south to the humidity of Florida’s tomato fields to follow the harvest. From the Producers of the Academy-Award Nominated film, WAR/DANCE and Executive Producer Eva Longoria, this award-winning documentary provides an intimate glimpse into the lives of these children who struggle to dream while working 12–14 hours a day, 7 days a week to feed America. This is the first of four films presented in the series “Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month,” organized by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Thursday, 27 September, 7:00 PM: Waste Land (Lucy Walker, 2010)
Filmed over nearly three years, Waste Land follows renowned artist Vik Muniz as he journeys from his home base in Brooklyn to his native Brazil and the world’s largest garbage dump, Jardim Gramacho, located on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro. There he photographs an eclectic band of “catadores”—self-designated pickers of recyclable materials. Muniz’s initial objective was to “paint” the catadores with garbage. However, his collaboration with these inspiring characters as they recreate photographic images of themselves out of garbage reveals both the dignity and despair of the catadores as they begin to re-imagine their lives. Director Lucy Walker and co-directors João Jardim and Karen Harley have great access to the entire process and, in the end, offer stirring evidence of the transformative power of art and the alchemy of the human spirit. This is the second of four films presented in the series “Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month,” organized by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Friday, 28 September, 7:30 PM: Special Screening: The Revolutionary (Sidney Rittenberg, 2011)
Sidney Rittenberg arrived in China as a GI Chinese language expert at the end of World War II. Discharged there, he joined the Chinese Communist Party, and was an active participant in the Chinese communist revolution and its aftermath. An intimate of the Party’s leadership, including Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai, he gained prominence at the Broadcast Administration, one of the most important agencies of government. But in the convulsions of a giant country constantly reinventing itself, he twice ran afoul of the leadership, and served a total of 16 years in solitary confinement. Over a five-year period, award-winning former-CBS journalist and China specialist, Irv Drasnin, interviewed Rittenberg to produce a compelling, complex, and unique understanding of the 20th century’s biggest revolution in the film The Revolutionary. The film is screened in connection with the Program in the Humanities’ Adventures in Ideas program “China Since 1949,” sponsored by the Program in the Humanities and Human Values, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Department of History, the Carolina Asia Center, and the Ackland Art Museum. *Note: Admission to this screening is free.

Thursday, 4 October, 7:00 PM: Nostalgia for the Light (Patricio Guzmán, 2010)
Director Patricio Guzmán travels 10,000 feet above sea level to the driest place on earth, the Atacama Desert, where atop the mountains astronomers from all over the world gather to observe the stars. The sky is so translucent that it allows them to see right to the boundaries of the universe. The Atacama is also a place where the harsh heat of the sun keeps human remains intact: those of Pre-Columbian mummies; 19th century explorers and miners; and the remains of political prisoners, “disappeared” by the Chilean army after the military coup of September, 1973. Melding the celestial quest of the astronomers and the earthly one of the women, Nostalgia for the Light is a gorgeous, moving, and deeply personal odyssey. *Note: Admission to this screening is free. This is the third of four films presented in the series “Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month,” organized by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Thursday, 4 October, 7:00 PM: Grave of the Fireflies (Isao Takahata, 1988)
This animated wartime tragedy follows the trials of a brother and sister during the final months of World War II in Japan. The animation used in this survival story, reminiscent of the woodblock prints of Hiroshige (some on which are on view in the Ackland exhibition Pictures of Vanity Fair: The Traditional Japanese Print), heightens the emotional drama portrayed in the film. Roger Ebert called Grave of the Fireflies “one of the greatest war films ever made.” This film will be screened following a public lecture by Susan Napier (Tufts University) that explores Japanese anime in postwar Japan. The talk, entitled “Fire and Water: The Apocalyptic Imagination of Hayao Miyazaki,” and the screening will both take place in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the Fed Ex Global Education Center at UNC-Chapel Hill. It is also the first film in the series “Aesthetics of the End: Cinema of Apocalypse in Japan” presented in connection with the Ackland’s Season of Japan*Note: Admission to this screening is free.

Thursday, 11 October, 7:00 PM: Revolution | Revolución (multiple directors, 2010)
Made to mark the centenary of the Mexican revolution, the surprisingly cohesive compilation film Revolución initiated by production company Canana’s founders Gael García Bernal, Diego Luna, and Pablo Cruz, features shorts by 10 directors. Taken as a whole, the segments–sometimes humorous, poignant, schmaltzy, spontaneous, disturbing, and rebellious–subversively question the achievements of the Mexican Revolution and its legacy. Directors include: Mariana Chenillo, Fernando Eimbcke, Amat Escalante, Gael García Bernal, Rodrigo García, Diego Luna, Gerardo Naranjo, Rodrigo Plá, Carlos Reygadas, and Patricia Riggen. *Note: Admission to this screening is free. This is the final film presented in the series “Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month,” organized by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Tuesday, 16 October, 7:00 PM: Nar | Pomegranate (Umit Unal, 2011)
Like the seeds of a pomegranate, each of us is distinct, yet connected. Nar is the story of a woman’s search for justice explores the tensions between our similarities and our differences, and the risks of challenging the community that binds us together. This is the second of three films presented in the series “Cinema of the Global Middle East,” sponsored by Art/Islam, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies. *Note: Admission to this screening is free.

Thursday, 25 October, 7:00 PM: Gojira | Godzilla (Ishiro Honda, 1954)
Rarely seen on the big screen, this classic of Japanese science fiction film tell the story of Godzilla, a giant reptilian creature mutated by nuclear radiation. The monster attacks the people of Japan, forcing them to relive the horrors nuclear devastation. The people fight back, but Godzilla’s presence leaves lingering questions about the apocalyptic atmosphere of postwar Japan. This is the second film in the series “Aesthetics of the End: Cinema of Apocalypse in Japan” presented in connection with the Ackland’s Season of Japan.

Thursday, 1 November, 7:00 PM: Barefoot Gen (Mori Masaki, 1983)
This animated wartime films tells the story of the bombing of Hiroshima from the perspective of a child named Gen. The film follows Gen through the apocalyptic aftermath of the bomb, bearing witness to the devastation but allowing for an eventual sense of hope. This is the third film in the series “Aesthetics of the End: Cinema of Apocalypse in Japan” presented in connection with the Ackland’s Season of Japan.

Thursday, 8 November, 7:00 PM: Ran (Akira Kurosawa, 1985)
Considered one of Japanese master filmmaker Akira Kurosawa’s finest epic films, Ran depicts the story of an aging samurai warrior who must divide his power among his three sons. The film is partly based on Shakespeare’s King Lear, but its narrative also borrows from a medieval Japanese legend and, possibly, some of the acclaimed director’s own life. This is the final film in the series “Aesthetics of the End: Cinema of Apocalypse in Japan” presented in connection with the Ackland’s Season of Japan.

Thursday, 15 November, 7:00 PM: Silent Films with Original Live Music
The Ascolta Ensemble (Stuttgart, Germany) performs live film underscoring to a number of silent films. Among other pieces of existing and newly-composed film scores, the ensemble will premiere a work by UNC Professor of Composition Allen Anderson to accompany the iconic experimental short film Filmstudie by Hans Richter. This screening/performance is the first of three events in the Talking Music Series in the UNC-Chapel Hill Department of Music.

Thursday, 29 November, 7:00 PM: Gaza Hospital (Marco Pasquini, 2009)
In the 1970s, Beirut’s Gaza Hospital was established as the main medical services center run by the Palestinian Liberation Organization in Lebanon. Today, the shell of the war-scarred building is home to hundreds of Palestinian refugee families. Due to its location at the crossroads between Sabra and Shatila refugee camps, this ten floor structure had witnessed uncountable key episodes in Palestinian history. Drawing on archive film from the Hospital’s past, and on interviews with Hospital staff, Pasquini’s elegantly composed documentary chronicles this history, from the Hospital’s celebrated foundation as a cornerstone of a revolutionary welfare program begun by the PLO, to its destruction and subsequent transformation into a vertical refugee camp. This is the final of three films presented in the series “Cinema of the Global Middle East,” sponsored by Art/Islam, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies. *Note: Admission to this screening is free.

SPRING 2012

19 Jan: D’Est (1993, Dir. Chantal Akerman, Documentary, 107 min)
In this essentially visual film, free of dialogue and voice-over, Akerman presents a mesmerizing repertory of people and landscapes recorded on her journey through East Germany, Poland, and Russia during a changing and precarious time. Returning to the formally rigorous aesthetic of “News From Home,” the film she made 15 years earlier about New York City, Akerman’s moving panorama of ‘the East” is not only a record of a time and place but also of a singular cinematic method. The film is part of the Documentary, Adjective film series, programmed by Adnan Dzumhur (Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures). D’est is presented with the support of Cultural Services of the French Embassy, New York.

26 Jan: Bloc Animation Project 2012 (2012, multiple filmmakers, animated shorts)
The Bloc Animation Project is an annual film festival displaying a collection of short animated films by up-and-coming as well as established animators from around the World. The Ackland Film Forum is proud to host the US Premiere Screening, which features 18 new short films from the United States and around the world. Sponsored by the Friends of the Bloc Animation Festival and the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

2 Feb: Miss Representation (2011, Dir. Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Documentary, 85 min)
Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, this film exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America. The film challenges the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls. This film is being shown in connection with Gender Week at UNC-Chapel Hill (Feb 6-10) and is co-sponsored by the Carolina Women’s Center, UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and the Ackland Art Museum.

9 Feb: Mississippi Masala (1991, Dir. Mira Nair, Fiction, 118 min)
Set in modern day Mississippi, this film traces the difficult love story of Meena, the daughter of Ugandan-Indian refugees, and Demetrius, an African-American man. This film is presented as part of the Center for the Study of the American South’s “Southern Film Series,” whose theme for 2011-12 is “the changing demographics of the American south.” Sponsored by the Center for the Study of the American South at UNC-Chapel Hill.

16 Feb: The Invisible Frame (2009, Dir. Cynthia Beatt, Documentary, 60 min)
A year before the collapse of the Berlin Wall, Beatt made a short documentary with the young Tilda Swinton: surveying the Berlin Wall on a bicycle. Twenty years later, Tilda Swinton once again rides the border line – but this time she explores the changing landscape on both sides of the former Wall. The film interweaves images of contemporary Berlin with a voice-over in the form of Swinton’s recollections and musings, complete with an astonishing soundscape composed by Simon Fisher Turner, who collaborated with Derek Jarman and Tilda Swinton in the 80’s. The film is part of the Documentary, Adjective film series, programmed by Adnan Dzumhur (Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures). Invisible Frame is presented with the support of the Film Archive of the Goethe-Institut Boston. *This is a FREE screening.

23 Feb: Hell and Back Again (2011, Dir. Danfung Dennis, Documentary, 88 min)
In this documentary, photojournalist Danfung Dennis follows the wartime journey of 25-year-old Sergeant Nathan Harris of the US Marine Corps, beginning with stunning war reportage and continuing with an intimate portrayal of Harris’ reintegration into civilian life at home in North Carolina. Presented in connection with The Making of a King: Henry IV and Henry V by William Shakespeare, on stage at PlayMakers Repertory Theater 29 Jan – 4 Mar 2012. Sponsored by PlayMakers Repertory Company. *This is a FREE screening.

1 Mar: The Loving Story (2011, Dir. Nancy Buirski, Fiction, 77 min)
With a moderated Panel Discussion
The Loving Story, a documentary film that tells the story of Richard and Mildred Loving, examines the drama, history, and current state of interracial marriage and tolerance in the United States. This film is presented in connection with the Center for the Study of the American South’s “Southern Film Series,” whose 2011-12 theme is “the changing demographics of the American south.” Following the film, stay for a Panel Discussion featuring Edward Ayers (President, University of Richmond, and distinguished historian of the American South) and Mark Anthony Neal (Professor of African and African American Studies, Duke University). Moderated by Gene Nichol (Boyd Tinsley Distinguished Professor of Law and Director, UNC Law School’s Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity). For more info, click here. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of the American South at UNC-Chapel Hill.

8 Mar: Space, Land, and Time: Underground Adventures with Ant Farm (2009, Dirs. Laura Harrison and Elizabeth Federici, Documentary)
This film traces the work of performance-art collective Ant Farm, the group responsible for the iconic installation work Cadillac Ranch. The film contains video, music, animation, and editing that captures the spirit of this unique underground group. The film’s animators, Francesca Talenti (UNC-Chapel Hill, Communication Studies) and Marc Russo (North Carolina State University, Art & Design), will discuss their roles in the construction of the film. Sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

15 Mar: World’s Largest (2010, Dirs. Elizabeth Donius and Amy Elliott, Documentary, 75 min)
Desperate for tourism, hundreds of small towns across the U.S.A. claim the “world’s largest” something—from 15-foot fiberglass strawberries to 40-foot concrete pheasants. World’s Largest visits 58 such sites and profiles Soap Lake, Washington’s four-year struggle to build the World’s Largest Lava Lamp. Presented in connection with The Spectacular of Vernacular, on view at the Ackland 14 Jan – 18 Mar 2012, and sponsored by the Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill.

22 Mar: Abendland (2011, Dir. Nikolaus Geyrhalter, 90 min)
An observational film about a continent at night. Europe, that often somewhat self-obsessively sees itself as the crown of human civilization, is presented here in an assemblage of images of work, leisure, worship and death. Western standards of living, prosperity, and the urge to exclude others are at the core of Geyrhalter’s cinematic essay about the West and the structures that reinforce its exclusiveness. This film is part of the Documentary, Adjective film series, programmed by Adnan Dzumhur (Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures). It is sponsored by the UNC Center for European Studies and the Austrian Cultural Forum, Washington.

27 Mar (Tuesday): Film, Light, Vision: Phenomenologies of Film in Experimental and Avant-Garde Cinema
A program of select 16mm experimental and avant-garde films that explore the materialities of cinema (film, light, projection, screen) and the modalities of vision. This program is curated and presented by graduate students in the departments of Comparative Literature, English, and German and by Dr. Inga Pollmann (UNC-Chapel Hill, German).
Sponsored by the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literature at UNC and the Sawyer Seminar Phenomenology, Minds & Media at Duke.

5 April: Marwencol (2009, Documentary)
In order to cope with his physical and psychic wounds after being brutally beaten, Mark Hogancamp created the fantasy world of “Marwencol,” a one-sixth scale World War II-era town built in his upstate New York backyard. When Hogancamp’s photographs of his work are “discovered” and brought to a New York gallery, he must make the difficult transition both back to the outside world and into his new position as “outsider artist.” This film is shown in connection with the Ackland Art Museum’s exhibitions Thornton Dial: Thoughts on Paper and Piece by Piece: Quilts, Collages, and Constructions (both on view 30 Mar – 1 Jul 2012).

TUESDAY, 10 April: Art21 Access ’12: “Change” (2012, Documentary)
How do artists respond to a world in flux? In what ways do artists act as agents of change, and what kinds of aesthetic choices do they make to express it? This episode features artists who bear witness, through their work, to transformation—cultural, material, and aesthetic—and actively engage communities as collaborators and subjects. This film is sponsored by the Sloane Art Library at UNC-Chapel Hill. Art21 Access ’12 is a global campaign providing access to contemporary art and artists through hundreds of public screenings and events celebrating the premiere of Season Six of the Peabody Award-winning television series, Art in the Twenty-First Century.

19 April: I’m Not There (2007, Dir. Todd Haynes)
Director Todd Haynes depicts “the many lives of Bob Dylan” through six portraits of Dylan-inspired characters (each played by a separate actor), weaving together the story of the famous musician’s life using non-traditional narrative techniques.
Sponsored by the UNC-Chapel Hill Department of American Studies.

26 April: Swain Lot Festival, Part 1 (2012, Short Films)
Part one of two in the annual festival of student films at UNC, these screenings will feature a juried show of the best works produced in 2011-12 by the media production students in the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill. This screening is sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

3 May: Swain Lot Festival, Part 2 (2012, Short Films)
The second part of the annual festival of student films at UNC, these screenings will feature a juried show of the best works produced in 2011-12 by the media production students in the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill. This screening is sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

10 May: Junebug (2005, Fiction, 106 min)
A dealer in “outsider” art travels from Chicago to North Carolina to meet her new in-laws, challenging the equilibrium of this middle class Southern home. This film is shown in connection with the Ackland Art Museum’s exhibitions Thornton Dial: Thoughts on Paper and Piece by Piece: Quilts, Collages, and Constructions (both on view 30 Mar – 1 Jul 2012).

FALL 2011

22 Sept: Cooking History (2010) dir. Peter Kerekes
Based on 11 recipes of army cooks, this documentary examines how the everyday needs of thousands of armed stomachs affect the victories and defeats of statesmen, from WWII through Chechnya. Part of a retrospective of documentaries about Eastern Europe presented by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at UNC-Chapel Hill. Adnan Dzuhmur (Lecturer, Slavic Languages, UNC-CH) will give a short introduction to the film and the series as a whole.

29 Sept: Herb & Dorothy (2008) dir. Megumi Sasaki
This documentary tells the extraordinary story of Herbert Vogel, a postal clerk, and Dorothy Vogel, a librarian, who managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history with very modest means. This is the first in a series of three films presented by the Ackland Art Museum and the Interdisciplinary Program in Cinema in connection with Carolina Collects: 150 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art from Alumni Collections.

6 Oct: Who the #$&% is Jackson Pollock? (2006) dir. Harry Moses
This documentary depicts the attempts of Teri Horton, a 73-year-old former truck driver, to authenticate and sell a painting that she purchased at a thrift store for $5 as an original Jackson Pollock. This is the second in a series of three films presented by the Ackland Art Museum and the Interdisciplinary Program in Cinema in connection with Carolina Collects.

13 Oct: The Collector: Allan Stone’s Life in Art (2007) dir. Olympia Stone
This film explores the 46-year career of Allan Stone, the famed New York City gallery owner and art collector. Producer and director Olympia Stone reveals her father’s compulsive collecting genius while telling the parallel story of his lifelong journey through the art world from the 1950s to 2006. Viewers are taken on an extraordinary path inside one man’s obsessive submersion in art and its influence on the artists, art dealers and family members with whom he worked and lived. A short talk by Olympia Stone, the film’s director and Allan Stone’s daughter, will accompany the screening. This is the final film in a series of three presented by the Ackland Art Museum and the Interdisciplinary Program in Cinema in connection with Carolina Collects.

20 Oct: The Freedom Riders (2011) dir. Stanley Nelson
PlayMakers Repertory Company and Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies present this film, in collaboration with the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. The film explores the themes of PlayMakers’ upcoming production of The Parchman Hour. A discussion of the film by Mike Wiley, the director and playwright of The Parchman Hour, and Laurens Grant, the film’s producer, will accompany the screening. *This screening is free to all.

27 Oct: Showboat (1951) dir. George Sidney
As part of its Southern Film Series, the Center for the Study of the American South presents Showboat in its original 35mm format. This is the first of three films that explore the changing demographics of the South, the theme of the CSAS’s 2011-2012 Southern Film Series. Following the film, a panel discussion will be held in the theater.

3 Nov: Videograms of a Revolution (1992) dir. Harun Farocki and Andrei Ujica
This is the second film presented in the retrospective of documentaries about Eastern Europe organized by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at UNC-Chapel Hill.

10 Nov: Imbue Up (2011)
In connection with the Ackland’s exhibition Carolina Collects, this multimedia project showcases the talents of UNC young alumni. Imbue Up features seven short films, each corresponding to a track on an album of the same name by Pressed And (2011, Crash Symbols), a musical collaboration between Andrew Hamlet (BA ’10) and Mat Jones (BFA ’10). For a trailer for the project, click here.

17 Nov: Powers of Ten and other experimental films by Charles and Ray Eames
This collection of short films by artists Charles and Ray Eames is presented by the Art Department at UNC-Chapel Hill and shown in connection with Art 473: Early Modern and Modern Decorative Arts. The films will be introduced by Dr. JJ Bauer (UNC-CH).

1 Dec: Marija’s Own (2011) dir. Zeljka Sukova
Presented in the retrospective series of documentaries about Eastern Europe organized by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at UNC-Chapel Hill.

8 Dec: Animals and Cinema: A Reflection on the Relationship Among Animals, Humans, and Technology
This program combines weird, pensive, shocking and funny shorts and film clips that explore our relationship with animals by means of the medium film. The films encompass an entire century (1894-2010) and a range of genres, from experimental films to cartoons and popular scientific films. Introduced and compiled by Dr. Inga Pollmann (Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at UNC-Chapel Hill).

15 Dec: Blank City (2010) dir. Céline Danhier
The Interdisciplinary Program in Cinema at UNC-Chapel Hill presents this recent documentary that explores the gritty history of filmmaking in 1970s and 80s New York City. The film is shown in connection with the course Communication Studies 550: American Independent Cinema.