Uzzle Buzz: Collection Connection

“Uzzle Buzz” is a series of blog posts, written by various authors, that respond to or comment on some aspect of our exhibition All About America: Photographs by Burk Uzzle.

Carolyn Allmendinger is Director of Academic Programs at the Ackland Art Museum.

Barn with Deer, 2009   Roe Deer in the Snow

When the Ackland’s acquisitions committee discusses the reasons to add a work of art to the collection, one of the things we consider is how our audiences might engage with that work. In the case of Barn with Deer, we knew that we wanted to include it in the exhibition All About America. In addition, we remembered that one of our Ackland Student Guides had designed a gallery tour called “The Art of the Hunt.” Barn with Deer, we thought, would be a great addition to that tour if she wanted to offer an encore performance. Thematically, it goes particularly well with Gustave Courbet’s painting, Roe Deer in the Snow, on view in the Museum’s collection galleries. Both Uzzle’s and Courbet’s works depicted rustic winter scenes in which deer figured prominently – in Courbet’s painting they are just off of the composition’s center and Uzzle’s a deer skin with head attached is at the lower left. Continue reading

Uzzle Buzz: Barn with Deer

“Uzzle Buzz” is a series of blog posts, written by various authors, that respond to or comment on some aspect of our exhibition All About America: Photographs by Burk Uzzle.

Patricia Leighten is Professor in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University and guest curator of All About America.

Barn with Deer, 2009

Burk Uzzle, American, born 1938: Barn with Deer, 2009; carbon print. 30 x 37-7/16 in. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The William A. Whitaker Foundation Fund, 2015.12.1. © Burk Uzzle.

Burk Uzzle’s travel across twentieth- and twenty-first-century America is a trip through time and across the land, resulting in a significant and diverse body of work. After his close involvement in a time of convulsing social conflict and change, Uzzle was able to move beyond photojournalism, broadening his perspective to look at many aspects of our culture. In each decade he experimented with media and with differing sizes of his prints. And in each case he conveyed his vision—from the dramatic to the whimsical—in a way best suited to the subject. Continue reading