TBT – A decade of exhibitions

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The Ackland will celebrate its 60th anniversary this fall and though we’ve been thinking (extensively!) about the future, we couldn’t help but take a quick look back at where we’ve been; we’ve had no shortage of stunning exhibitions throughout our history and we couldn’t be prouder!

Testing Testing: Painting and Sculpture since 1960 from the Permanent Collection
17 July 2015  3 January 2016

Testing Testing showed how art made since 1960 tested possibilities both within and beyond conventional boundaries of art making. Artists used experimentation, innovation, and skill to assess new materials in different combinations while also pushing the envelope of traditional modes, such as figuration and abstraction.

This exhibition presented the Ackland’s largest (and relatively unknown) collection of modern painting and sculpture to date, featuring works by approximately 50 artists such as José Bedia, Sanford Biggers, Anthony Caro, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Thornton Dial, Barkley Hendricks, Rachel Howard, Annette Lemieux, Al Held, Hung Liu (below), Takashi Murakami, Kenneth Noland, Richard Nonas, Jules Olitski, Tony Oursler, Nam June Paik, Philip Pearlstein, Ken Price, Sean Scully, George Segal, Yinka Shonibare, Lorna Simpson, Do-Ho Suh, Stella Waitzkin, John Wesley, and H.C. Westermann.

Genius and Grace: François Boucher and the Generation of 1700
23 January 2015 5 April 2015

Genius and Grace presented exemplary drawings by 27 accomplished artists who influenced the practices of art and draftsmanship for much of the eighteenth century. Their vision, combined with their enormous technical skill, ensured the full realization of the rococo — the bold, graceful, and fluid manner so characteristic of French art of the first half of the eighteenth century. The brilliant career of François Boucher, the best-known artist of his generation, was represented in the show by 19 drawings. Other artists featured in the exhibition included Jean-Antoine Watteau, Jean-Baptiste Oudry, Charles-Joseph Natoire, Charles-Antoine Coypel, and Carle Vanloo.

 

In Pursuit of Strangeness: Wyeth and Westermann in Dialogue
14 June 2013  25 August 2013

Through works by Andrew Wyeth and H.C. Westermann, In Pursuit of Strangeness explored diverse responses in American art to the uncanny home, as well as domestic architecture’s role in defining the boundaries between ourselves and the outside world.

Dating from the early twentieth century to the present, the works exemplified the complexities of our relationship to home and place through unsettling perspectives and unusual materials, subverting the understanding of home as familiar (heimlich) and transforming it into something foreign (unheimlich). The exhibition also investigated the difference between a house and a home, as well as how homes become extensions of their inhabitants. In addition to Wyeth and Westermann, other artists in the show included Ralph Gibson, Marilyn Anne Levine, Bruce Nauman, Aaron Siskind, and Minor White, among others.

Catch and Release: Seafood Imagery from the Ackland Art Museum and the North Carolina Museum of Art
26 September 2012  4 November 2012

Catch and Release considered how various cultures throughout history have used and understood seafood. It was the culmination of the new Joan and Robert Huntley Art History Scholarship for graduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill, which supported collaboration between the Ackland and the North Carolina Museum of Art. In keeping with the goals of the Scholarship, this exhibition aimed to unite objects from both collections in a way that was unique to the two museums.

 

Big Shots: Andy Warhol Polaroids
2 October 2010  2 January 2011

Best known as a painter and filmmaker, Andy Warhol was also a prolific photographer. Bringing together moments of his art, work, and life, and considering them as the intertwined parts of an artistic whole, Big Shots included approximately 250 Polaroids and 70 gelatin silver black-and-white prints taken by Warhol between 1970 and 1987. The exhibition presented a multitude of images Warhol accumulated as part of his creative process against black-and-white snapshots captured during leisure time. Seen together, this critical mass of photos allowed for exceptional glimpses into Warhol’s working methods, as well as his personal perspective on the New York “scene” of the ’70s and ’80s.

Circa 1958: Breaking Ground in American Art
21 September 2008  4 January 2009

1958 was a remarkable year: it was a time of transition and experimentation in American art and culture, and for the United States, a time of unbridled optimism yet one of uncertainty. The country was experiencing an unprecedented rate of economic growth, prosperity, and international leadership following World War II but at the same time, world events offered sobering reminders of the fragility of peace and the prevalence of the Cold War. It was during this time that Khrushchev became Premier of the Soviet Union and President Eisenhower established NASA thus launching the space race. Worldwide concern for the possibility of nuclear annihilation resulted in the establishment of the international peace movement. Across the country, a growing awareness of discrimination and social unrest would bring about the Civil Rights Movement and the Women’s Rights Movement in the 1960s.

Circa 1958 explored two vastly different trends that emerged in and around 1958, post-painterly abstraction and assemblage. In each case, the artists presented very new and entirely different approaches to art making. Together, these two trends laid the groundwork for much of the American art that came to define the second half of the twentieth century.

 

Hung Liu, American, born in China, born 1948: Peaches, 2002; oil on canvas. Ackland Fund, 2002.7. © 2002 Hung Liu.
François Boucher, Recumbent Female Nude (detail), circa 1742-43; red, white, and black chalk on cream antique laid paper, 26 x 35.2 cm. The Horvitz Collection, Boston.
Andrew Wyeth, American, 1917-2009: Weatherside, 1965; tempera. North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, Promised Gift of Ann and Jim Goodnight, © Andrew Wyeth.
Andy Warhol, American, 1928-1987; Bianca Jagger, 1979; Polacolor Type 108, 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. (10.8 x 8.57 cm); Gift of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, 2008.24.13
Kenneth Noland, American, 1924-2010; That, 1958-59; oil on canvas, 83 x 83 x 1 3/4 in. (210.82 x 210.82 x 4.45 cm); Collection of David Mirvish, Toronto, L2008.53. Art © Kenneth Noland/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY