Family and Friends Sunday: Sacred Wasteland

Family and Friends Sunday: Sacred Wasteland
Sunday, 28 April 2019 | 2-5 PM

Image Credit: Sarah Elizabeth Cornejo, American, born 1993: Halfies, Pt. 1 (detail), 2019. Earth, saw dust, steel, wood glue, coral, alligator garfish scales, oyster shells, rocks, cement, volcanic rock, sharks’ teeth, pig intestines, epoxy, lichen, barnacles, acrylic paint, and windshield glass.

Art lovers of all ages are invited to join us for a special Family and Friends Sunday inspired by the Ackland’s 2019 MFA Exhibition, Sacred Wasteland.

Ackland Art Museum’s Annual Luncheon

Image result for barbara babcock millhouse

This year’s annual luncheon speaker will be Barbara Babcock Millhouse, founder of Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem.

In addition to being founder of Reynolda House and the driving force behind the museum’s exemplary collection, Barbara Babcock Millhouse also has an outstanding private collection of American art ranging from the eighteenth century Hesselius portraits to twentieth century artists such as Andres Serrano and Lee Krasner.  Several of her modernist pieces are currently in the Hopper to Pollock exhibition at Reynolda House.  Her small sculpture collection includes such notables as Noguchi and Archipenko.

CLICK HERE to purchase your tickets!!

For questions please contact Hailey Hargraves.

Public Celebration for Sacred Wasteland: Selected Works by the MFA Class of 2019

A public reception to celebrate the exhibition will be held on Thursday, April 25, from 5 to 8 p.m.

Sacred Wasteland: Selected Works by the MFA Class of 2019

19 April – 26 May 2019

Sacred Wasteland presents work by the nine studio artists of the 2019 Master of Fine Arts graduating class and celebrates the blending of traditional and non-traditional approaches, as well as the thoughtful repurposing of materials to reveal layers of each artist’s idiosyncratic curiosities. Each of the candidates mines the rich and complicated realities of our world using objects, techniques, and subjects that might typically be discarded or overlooked in their original contexts. In many cases, the artists’ personal narratives are directly intertwined with their material choices, and their constructions and aesthetic interventions illuminate the public value of private artifacts. Their work inspires important questions about humanity’s proficiency at isolating, elevating, destroying, and memorializing people and resources over the course of a single lifespan. As these artists investigate the perception of cultural and material wastelands, they imbue what they find there with all the care and attention we reserve for the sacred.

Participating artists include Jonh Blanco, Sarah Elizabeth Cornejo, John DeKemper II, Peter Hoffman, Michael Keaveney, Jasper Lee, Laura Little, Reuben Mabry, and Chieko Murasugi.

Sacred Wasteland is curated by William Paul Thomas. Thomas is a 2013 alumnus of the MFA program in Studio Art at UNC-Chapel Hill and is the artist in residence at Duke University’s Rubenstein Art Center from January until March 2019.

Image: Sarah Elizabeth Cornejo, American, born 1993: Halfies, Pt. 1 (detail), 2019. Earth, saw dust, steel, wood glue, coral, alligator garfish scales, oyster shells, rocks, cement, volcanic rock, sharks’ teeth, pig intestines, epoxy, lichen, barnacles, acrylic paint, and windshield glass. Courtesy of the artist.

Drawing in the Galleries

The second Saturday of every month, Amanda Hughes leads participants in a creative exploration of a particular object in the Ackland’s collection.

For all sessions, bring paper and dry media (crayon, pencils, etc.). All levels are welcome.

Free and open to the public. No reservation is necessary.

UNC Science Expo

Visit the Ackland’s booth at the UNC Science Expo at Morehead Planetarium to sketch neurons based on the work of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the father of modern neuroscience featured in the exhibition The Beautiful Brain. Build a working model of a neuron to demonstrate the neuron doctrine. Food trucks and many other activities on site. Visit the Ackland and the Ackland Museum Store before or after the Science Expo: we are open from 10AM-5PM.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image Credit: Santiago Ramón y Cajal, The pyramidal neuron of the cerebral cortex, 1904, ink and pencil on paper. Courtesy of Instituto Cajal (CSIC).

Drawing in the Galleries

The second Saturday of every month, Amanda Hughes leads participants in a creative exploration of a particular object in the Ackland’s collection.

For all sessions, bring paper and dry media (crayon, pencils, etc.). All levels are welcome.

Free and open to the public. No reservation is necessary.

Drawing in the Galleries

The second Saturday of every month, Amanda Hughes leads participants in a creative exploration of a particular object in the Ackland’s collection.

For all sessions, bring paper and dry media (crayon, pencils, etc.). All levels are welcome.

Free and open to the public. No reservation is necessary.

Drawing in the Galleries

The second Saturday of every month, Amanda Hughes leads participants in a creative exploration of a particular object in the Ackland’s collection.

For all sessions, bring paper and dry media (crayon, pencils, etc.). All levels are welcome.

Free and open to the public. No reservation is necessary.

Exposure and Conservation: Presenting the Peck Collection in Perpetuity

The theme of the second in our ongoing series of selections from the recently donated Peck Collection of Dutch and Flemish drawings is “Ruins.” The topic of transience and decay seems an appropriate prompt for a quick discussion of the effects of time and exposure, not only on the grand structures of the Dutch and Roman past but also on 17th-century drawings themselves.

At the Ackland, we are often asked why the Pecks’ wonderful gift is not permanently on view in its entirety. Are we not proud and thrilled at this extraordinary enrichment of the Ackland collection and the cultural landscape of North Carolina? Indeed we are – so much so, in fact, that we not only yearn to show everything to everybody, but we add another dimension to that wish: everything to everybody, forever.

It is this last word, “forever”, that provides a clue to the answer as to why our visitors cannot see all 134 Peck Collection drawings, including the seven by Rembrandt, all the time. When museum folk think about the institution’s audience, we think not only of our many and diverse constituencies visiting in 2017, but also of all the possible visitors of the year 2117, or 2217, and beyond. Our commitment is to preserve masterpieces of human creativity for as long as humanly possible (you’ll sometimes catch us uttering the phrase “in perpetuity”).

To achieve that, works of art that are sensitive to the effects of light must be protected from over-exposure. Light can fade inks and darken paper; it can even, in the worst case, make a work of art disappear. Therefore, we carefully control not only the level and type of light that all drawings in our collection are exposed to, but also the length of time they are on exhibition.

We are hard at work on a website that will showcase all the Peck Collection drawings in very high resolution digital images, with commentary and information. We will also present a full-scale exhibition of the entire gift, with a scholarly catalogue, as soon as we can – probably in four or five years. Until then, I encourage you to return to the Ackland regularly, as our focused selection of works from the Peck Collection will change every few months, offering fresh perspectives, themes, and questions. And I invite you to peruse the collection on our current public database.

The Peck Collection offers us exquisite examples of human creativity, “rescued” by the collectors from the contingencies of history and time. It is our job to ensure that these well-preserved masterpieces do not themselves become ruins, unavailable to future generations in their full glory. Your grandchildren and great grandchildren and on “into perpetuity” will silently thank you for your understanding.

Hendrik Hondius the Elder, Dutch, 1573-after 1649: Ruins of Castle Spangen, n.d.; Pen and brown ink, brown wash, over black chalk on paper. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Peck Collection, 2017.1.45.

Meet the Staff: Debbie Pulley

Debbie Pulley is the Ackland Art Museum’s Security Supervisor.

How long have you been at the Ackland?
I started at the Ackland in August 1990.

What brought you to the Ackland?
I had been working for Northern Telecom Security for about six years, and I wanted to do something different in the security field. I applied for both a detention officer job at the Durham County Sheriff’s Office and a position with UNC Security at the Ackland Art Museum. Both offered me a job, and my husband said I should take the UNC Security position. I’m so happy I did!

What do you do at the Ackland?
As the Security Supervisor, I’m on-call 24 hours. I’m responsible for training the security staff, protecting the Ackland’s collection, and assisting the visitors. I also train the Museum’s work study gallery assistants, make sure operating policies and procedures are implemented and followed by all personnel at all times, and monitor the Museum’s closed-circuit television (CCTV) system.

What is a memorable Ackland experience?
In August of 1990, the Museum staff was moving back into the building following a three-year closure for renovations. On December 2, 1990, I got to see the reopening party for the newly redesigned Ackland Art Museum. Then-director Charles Millard and Chancellor Paul Hardin were on-hand to receive ‘Welcome Back’ posters from children as we opened the doors (see photo). What an evening!

What is your favorite thing about working at the Ackland?
Seeing our growing collection. I also love working with university and K-12 students, as well as meeting visitors from all over the world.

SEE. MORE. ART.: What is your favorite arts experience in the Triangle?
I love DPAC (Durham Performing Arts Center).

Editor’s Note: Debbie Pulley was chosen as the UNC Department of Public Safety’s 2016 Employee of the Year. UNC Police Chief Jeff McCracken presented Pulley with the recognition at the department’s annual awards ceremony Friday, June 17, 2016.  Pulley—who was also recognized for 25 years of service to the agency—was cited for the fresh passion she brings to her job every day as well as for leading by example and her kindness to her team, museum staff, and visitors to the Ackland.