Lost and Found: Stories for Vernacular Photographs

     

Since 2017, the Ackland Art Museum has worked with noted UNC alumnus and collector Robert E. Jackson (MA, ’78) to assemble a collection of vernacular photography. Vernacular photographs are those that are made by individuals, typically presumed to be non-artists, for a wide variety of reasons, including snapshots of everyday subjects taken for personal pleasure. When collected, vernacular photographs typically lack contextual information—basic identifiers such as the names of the subjects, locations, and photographers, as well as the dates the photos were taken—and are, therefore, often discussed and appreciated solely in terms of technique, aesthetic composition, and their amateur or “outsider” status. Lost and Found: Stories for Vernacular Photographs flips this script, inviting the public to supply narratives for the exhibited snapshots. Just as these vernacular photographs themselves—relegated to flea markets, thrift shops, and eBay—are rediscovered by avid collectors and institutions, so, too, can the lost contexts and narratives of these photos be “found” by newly created stories and captions.

Of the seventy photographs in the exhibition—their formats as wide-ranging as cyanotypes and Polaroids—a selection of twenty are part of a “context contest” that is open to the public. Individuals are encouraged to submit captions and short stories in response to the images. Selected captions and stories will be displayed alongside their generative photographs, with an invitation to all museum visitors to add their own responses to these works as well as to the other fifty photographs in the show. While the original stories behind them may never be known, Lost and Found invites viewers to celebrate the potential of these vernacular photographs to stimulate our collective storytelling imagination.

This exhibition is funded in part by a grant from Arts Everywhere.

LOST AND FOUND Public Programs

2nd Friday ArtWalk
December 13, 2019

LOST AND FOUND CAPTION AND Story Contest

Contest Instructions:

Select one photo from this list of 20 (also pictured below) that will be displayed in the exhibition, then write a photo caption (up to 50 words) or a story (50-300 words) to bring the photo to life! There are no restrictions on the form or content of your story, so be creative! You are welcome to submit more than one caption or story.

While we respect the creative autonomy of all artists, the Ackland reserves the right to edit submissions for propriety.

Deadlines:

Early bird deadline: December 8, 2019, 11:59 p.m.

Submissions before the early bird deadline will be considered for the early bird grand prize, AND they will also continue to be considered for all other prizes awarded at the conclusion of the exhibition. Early bird submissions are also the only way to guarantee that your submission is displayed within the exhibition galleries throughout the entire run!

Final deadline: January 5, 2020, 11:59 p.m.

Rolling submissions will be accepted through the end of the exhibition to be considered for all other prize categories. We will update the gallery displays with new stories as we receive them.

Prizes:

Early bird grand prize: $200 credit to the Museum Store

Twenty-four prizes to be awarded at the end of the exhibition:
In categories for under 18, 18+, UNC student, and UNC affiliate
For each of 2 submission formats: photo captions (fewer than 50 words) and stories (50-300 words)

1st place: $100 credit to the Museum Store

2nd place: Individual membership to the Ackland

Honorable mention: A copy of Fortune Smiles: The Tyche Foundation Gift, a collection catalogue including creative responses to the Ackland’s collection by NC author Allan Gurganus

Notifications:

Authors who submit before the early bird deadline will be notified of the outcome of their submission on December 13. Authors who submit before the final deadline will be notified by January 10.

Photo Gallery:

Lost and Found will include a total of 70 photographs. We are displaying 20 of them here in advance of the exhibition opening for you to choose from!

Contest Submission Form

  • Please enter a number from 1 to 20.
  • Accepted file types: doc, docx, pdf.

 


Image credits:

1: Unidentified artist, American, Group of Men Fighting, 1890s or 1900s?, cyanotype, 5 5/16 × 4 5/16 in. (13.5 × 10.9 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.8.

2: Unidentified artist, American, Woman Sticking Out Tongue, 1950s, gelatin silver print, 4 1/2 × 2 3/4 in. (11.4 × 7 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2017.24.13.

3: Unidentified artist, American, Women at the Zoo, c. 1909, gelatin silver print, 4 1/8 × 5 1/4 in. (10.5 × 13.3 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.9.

4: Unidentified artist, American, Children with Photo in Hand, 1980s, chromogenic color print, 3 3/8 × 3 1/4 in. (8.6 × 8.3 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2017.24.18.

5: Unidentified artist, American, Girl in Cinderella Costume, 1960s?, color photographic print, 3 13/16 × 4 11/16 in. (9.7 × 11.9 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.24.

6: Unidentified artist, American, People in Car, 1940s?, gelatin silver print, 3 7/8 × 5 1/2 in. (9.9 × 13.9 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.14.

7: William T. Ross, American, active 1880s–1890s, A Group of Seven Women Eating Cherries, 1880s-90s, cabinet card photograph, 4 1/4 × 6 1/2 in. (10.8 × 16.5 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2019.33.10.

8: Unidentified artist, American, Boys Sleeping, 1920s, gelatin silver print, 3 3/16 × 4 1/4 in. (8.1 × 10.8 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2017.24.1.

9: Whalen Photographic Studio, American, active late 19th to early 20th century, Gentleman of the Jury, late 19th to early 20th century, cabinet card photograph, 4 1/4 × 6 1/2 in. (10.8 × 16.5 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2019.33.27.

10: F. Lewis, American, active late 19th to early 20th century, Photographs of a Woman and Man Spliced Together, 1880s or 1890s?, gelatin silver print on carte-de-visite, 4 5/8 × 2 15/16 in. (11.7 × 7.4 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.1.

11: Unidentified artist, American, Double Exposure of a Man and a Group of Women, late 1980s/early 1990s, color photographic print, 4 7/8 × 3 7/16 in. (12.4 × 8.7 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2017.24.19.

12. Frank Wendt, American, active c. 1899, Man with Three Legs, c. 1899, cabinet card photograph, 6 7/16 × 4 1/4 in. (16.4 × 10.8 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2019.33.33.

13: Unidentified artist, American, Men Climbing Smoke Stacks, 1930s, gelatin silver print, 3 3/8 × 2 3/8 in. (8.6 × 6 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2017.24.4.

14: Charles A. Saylor, American, 1838–1921, Portrait of a Dog, 1880s-90s, cabinet card photograph, 6 7/16 × 4 3/16 in. (16.4 × 10.6 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2019.33.47.

15: Unidentified artist, American, Girl Throwing Football, 1971, color photographic print, 3 7/8 × 5 7/16 in. (9.9 × 13.8 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.27.

16: Unidentified artist, American, Man Blowing Bubble Gum, 1960s?, gelatin silver print, 3 1/4 × 4 1/4 in. (8.3 × 10.8 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.26.

17: Unidentified artist, American, Woman and Mirror, 1940s, gelatin silver print, 4 1/2 × 2 3/4 in. (11.4 × 7 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2017.24.7.

18: Unidentified artist, American, Portrait of a Woman, 1940s?, hand-tinted gelatin silver print, 4 7/8 × 3 3/8 in. (12.4 × 8.6 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.17.

19: Unidentified artist, American, Couple Wearing Swimming Masks, 1940s/early 1950s, gelatin silver print, 4 1/2 × 2 3/4 in. (11.4 × 7 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2017.24.11.

20: Unidentified artist, American, Group with a Snowman, 1890s or 1900s?, cyanotype, 4 5/8 × 4 1/8 in. (11.7 × 10.4 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ackland Fund, 2018.23.7.

Yayoi Kusama: Open the Shape Called Love

Yayoi Kusama is one of the most admired of all contemporary artists. Her “Infinity Rooms,” mirrored and specially lit environments, have recently been a premier attraction for art lovers all over the world. This exhibition presents the distinguished collection of James Keith Brown ’84 and Eric Diefenbach to explore other aspects of her oeuvre, with a special concentration on the early works on paper of the 1950s, a full range of intimate “dot paintings” and “net paintings,” examples of her provocative sculpture and multi-media work, and one tabletop mirror box.

Yayoi Kusama: Open the Shape Called Love PUBLIC PROGRAMS 

2nd Friday ArtWalk
March 13, 2020 | 5 – 9 p.m.

Family and Friends Sunday
March 22, 2020 | 2 – 5 p.m.

ACKLAND FILM FORUM

DATES

Monday, February 3, 2020: Paprika
Dir. Satoshi Kon, 2006, Japan

Tuesday, February 25, 2020: Mother
Dir. Bong Joon-ho, 2009, South Korea

Tuesday, March 16, 2020: The Grandmaster
Wong Kar-wai, 2013, Hong Kong

Tuesday, March 24, 2020: Syndromes and a Century
Dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2007, Thailand

TICKETS

$7; Free with UNC One Card
Tickets available at the Varsity Theatre, 123 E. Franklin St.

 


Yayoi Kusama: Open the Shape Called Love is supported in part by Bank of America.
Bank of America logo

Image:
Yayoi Kusama, Japanese, born 1929, Untitled, 1967, oil on masonite, 16 x 18 in. (40.6 x 45.7 cm). Collection of James Keith Brown ‘84 and Eric Diefenbach.

Toriawase: A Special Installation of Modern Japanese Art and Ceramics

Toriawase is a Japanese concept that loosely means to choose and combine objects with exquisite care. This special installation approaches the combination of modern art and ceramics in this spirit, aiming less for a historical or scholarly approach and more for an intuitive, experiential orchestration of relationships and correspondences. Modern and contemporary Japanese painting and sculpture are not often displayed or considered alongside ceramics of the same period. The exhibition draws on the Ackland’s holdings, as well as three major private collections: James Keith Brown ’84 and Eric Diefenbach, Mina Levin and Ronald Schwarz, and Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz.

This special installation has been organized by Peter Nisbet, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs, and Nathan Marzen, Head of Exhibition Design and Installation, with the assistance of Dr. Daniele Lauro, a recent graduate from the PhD program in the History Department at UNC-Chapel Hill and 2019 Richard Bland Fellow at the Ackland Art Museum.

 


Akiyama Yō, Japanese, born 1953, Untitled, MV-155, 2015, unglazed stoneware with silver coating, 9 5/8 x 22 3/8 x 15 inches. Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz Collection.

All the Rembrandt Drawings!

To mark the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt van Rijn’s death in 1669, the Ackland Art Museum is displaying its complete holdings of the artist’s drawings publicly for the first time for just two weeks. The seven drawings, which were donated in 2017 as part of the landmark Peck Collection gift, showcase Rembrandt’s drawing style and technique over the course of his career, revealing his virtuosic flair, keen insight, and eye for detail. Created over a twenty-year period from about 1635 to 1656, the drawings depict biblical and genre scenes, figure studies, and the Dutch landscape.

This special presentation of Rembrandt’s work highlights the Ackland as the only public university art museum in the United States to own a collection of the artist’s drawings and places the Museum among many other institutions worldwide, from Amsterdam to Abu Dhabi, that are celebrating Rembrandt and his art this year.

Click on the arrow above to hear about the exhibition.

Click HERE to read the press release.

Click HERE for an exhibition checklist.

Watch Curator Dana Cowen introduce the exhibition in the video below. Click here for a video playlist.

All the Rembrandt Drawings!  PUBLIC PROGRAMS

Looking Over Rembrandt’s Shoulder: A Discussion of the Peck Collection Drawings
Featuring Dana Cowen and Robert Fucci
Oct 11, 2019 | 5:00 PM, during the 2nd Friday ArtWalk

Dana Cowen, Sheldon Peck Curator for European and American Art before 1950, and Robert Fucci, Peck Collection Research Fellow will participate in an energetic conversation about Rembrandt’s renowned skill as a draftsman and his impact on the art world.

Free and open to the public. RSVP here.

All the Rembrandt Drawings!  Guided Tours

Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 1:30 p.m. (and 2:00 p.m., if the earlier tour fills):

October 4
October 9, 10, 11
October 16, 17, 18

Sundays at 2:30 p.m.:

October 6
October 13
October 20

First come, first served; space is limited to 15 visitors per tour.

All the Rembrandt Drawings!  Private Tours Available

Community groups may request a free, private, guided tour of All the Rembrandt Drawings (or any Ackland exhibition). Click here to request a tour for your group.

 


Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 1606-1669, Noli Me Tangere, c. 1655-56, pen and brown ink with touches of brown wash on paper, 8 9/16 × 7 5/16 in. (21.8 × 18.5 cm). Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Peck Collection, 2017.1.68.

Recent Acquisitions of Islamic Art

The Ackland recently launched a major initiative to build its collection of art from the Islamic world. A small exhibition, presented in conjunction with She Who Tells a Story, will showcase seven recent purchases, including calligraphic manuscripts, textiles, metalwork and an architectural fragment all dating from the 8th century CE to the 17th century.

There will be one rotation of the textiles and Qur’anic manuscripts on Friday, November 22, midway through the show.

In the future these artworks will be juxtaposed with other items in the collection, where they will offer rich comparisons.

 

Click here to read a discussion with Museum director Katie Ziglar about the new acquisitions.

 

Recent Acquisitions of Islamic Art PUBLIC PROGRAMS

Family and Friends Sunday
22 September 2019 | 2-5 PM

 


Unidentified artist, probably Iraqi, Baghdad, Jalayirid dynasty, 1336–1432, Leaf from the “5 Surahs” Qur’anic Album, c. 1370, ink and gold on paper, 17 × 13 3/4 in. (43.2 × 35 cm). Special Acquisition Fund, 2019.16.1.

ART& Intergalactic Soul, “Project LHAXX”

ART& Intergalactic Soul, Project LHAXX

As its newest temporary, site-specific commission in ART&, the Ackland presents Project LHAXX, a mixed-media experience by Intergalactic Soul. Intergalactic Soul describes the Afrofuturistic collaborative made up of Charlotte-based visual artists Marcus Kiser and Jason Woodberry and Durham-based performance artist Quentin Talley. Their work broadly focuses on presenting contemporary conversations about American black experiences, using the aesthetic and conceptual prisms of popular science fiction and comics to chronicle the various adventures of their fictional protagonists Astro and Pluto.

A mural of imagined Afrofuturist hieroglyphics and neon symbols inspired by the artists’ cultural traditions floats against a stark black background. Alongside, a monitor depicts spaceship schematics inspired by the forms of ceremonial masks found in the Dogon culture of West Africa. The artists unlock Project LHAXX’s “cosmic message” for viewers through content accessed via the free augmented reality application Artivive. The resulting immersive experience invites us to consider both the forces in society that allow for the absence and erasure of certain cultural histories and also ways in which those losses may be mitigated.

Project LHAXX takes its inspiration from Henrietta Lacks (American, 1920 – 1951), a young African-American tobacco farmer who sought treatment for cervical cancer at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1951. Unknown to Lacks, who eventually succumbed to her disease, her cells were saved following a biopsy and studied by researchers. In an example of scientific fact proving as potentially exceptional as any idea broached within science fiction, they soon found that her cells were the first “immortal” cell line that could reproduce indefinitely and be utilized in countless research applications, being especially noted for helping to develop the polio vaccine. These cells were for decades only attributed and known as “HeLa” cells until Henrietta Lacks’s role was explicitly acknowledged and popularized in the bestselling book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (2010). Her story feeds into Intergalactic Soul’s larger Afrofuturist goal: using history to imagine a future with black people actively involved and respected.

In describing their formative thoughts behind Project LHAXX, Kiser and Woodberry write, “The vast expanses of outer space can feel like nothingness, an absence of something that is both optimistic and pessimistic. Space can represent the ‘lack of,’ or it can represent potential. In this case, it represents the uncertainty and identity crisis that comes with growing up as a black, African American child. Not having a history, or being able to trace your ancestry. Kept in the dark about your heroes and heroines. To survive in the void … never seeing your own reflection. Yet to find your genius … your worth … yourself. To develop a culture, a community, and a language.”

During 2nd Friday ArtWalk on September 13, Marcus Kiser and Jason Woodberry will present an artist talk at 6 p.m. at the Ackland, followed by a 7:30 performance by Quentin Talley and the Soul Providers.

Marcus Kiser’s work draws inspiration from a broad range of sources ranging from classical art to comic books and graffiti. A Charlotte native, he is an artist and graphic designer who is comfortable in an equally broad range of media, from studio art to books, product design, and three-dimensional printing. His work pulls from mass media and a collective urban-based conscience, heavily influenced by current social and political issues. Kiser has recently done work with Jordan Brand and Adidas, and he is currently the creative director of orthopedic designs for UNYQ, a company that specializes in 3D-printed prosthetics and medical wearables.

Jason Woodberry is a digital illustration and mixed media artist. With a focus on software development and multimedia, Woodberry’s work has been featured in the 2014 Miami Art Basel, Jordan Hyper-tee program, hotelier La Maison Champs Elysees’ Parisian ad campaign, and more. In 2016, alongside Marcus Kiser, Woodberry was awarded a nine-month residency at the McColl Center for Art & Innovation. He has been included in the 2014/15 Arts & Science Council and Adams Outdoor Advertising ArtPop initiative. In addition to Woodberry’s fine art pursuits, his design and technical expertise is applied to his work as a developer and specialist in IT project management.

Quentin Talley is an accomplished poet, actor, director, and producer. He is the inaugural recipient of the 2012 LeadershipU Fellowship for emerging theater professionals, administered by Theater Communications Group and funded by The Andrew Mellon Foundation. Quentin is also the Founder and Artistic Director of OnQ Performing Arts in Charlotte, NC. OnQ is a non-profit professional theater dedicated to producing classic, contemporary, and original performance works that reflect the black experience. As a solo artist, Quentin recently released a new album entitled, #FreedomDay: A Musical Reparations Mixtape by The Talented Tenth of Mr. Talley.

Additional collaborators for the Project LHAXX installation include beatmaker Daryl Donald and band members of Quentin Talley and the Soul Providers.

Click on the arrow above to hear artist Marcus Kiser talk about the exhibition.

Project LHAXX Public Programs 

2nd Friday ArtWalk | Open ’til 9 PM

  • 6 PM: Artist talk with Marcus Kiser and Jason Woodberry
  • 7:30 PM: Music and spoken word performance by Quentin Talley and the Soul Providers

 


Image courtesy of Marcus Kiser.

An Artist and His Figures: Sculptures from the Collection of Rhonda Morgan Wilkerson, PhD

 

The second in an ongoing series of special installations of African art with loans from the distinguished collection of Rhonda Wilkerson, this presentation focuses on the important question of identifying individual artists for African sculptors and no longer simply assuming that all carvers were anonymous. The six sculptures, including one from the Ackland, are all by a single as yet unnamed artist working in the style of the Fante peoples of southern Ghana in the early twentieth century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Artist and His Figures Public programs

Family and Friends Sunday: Woodcarving, Calligraphy, and Mosaics, Oh My!
22 September 2019 | 2-5 PM

 


Unidentified Artist, Ghana?, Fante culture, Figure Group, 20th century, wood, 21 x 10 ½ x 5 ½ in. Ackland Fund, 2006.11.

She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

During this critical time for Iran and the Arab world, as national and personal identities are being dismantled and rebuilt, contemporary photography reflects the complexities of unprecedented change. One of the most significant trends to emerge is the work of women photographers, whose remarkable and provocative images provide insights into new cultural landscapes, questioning tradition and challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern and Arab identity. “She Who Tells a Story” brings together the vital pioneering work of 12 leading artists, ranging in genre from portraiture to documentary: Jananne Al-Ani, Boushra Almutawakel, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, Lalla Essaydi, Shadi Ghadirian, Tanya Habjouqa, Rula Halawani, Nermine Hammam, Rania Matar, Shirin Neshat, and Newsha Tavakolian. The exhibition features over 80 photographs, lent by the artists, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, and the collection of James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach.

In related news, the Ackland recently launched a major initiative to build its collection of art from the Islamic world. A small exhibition, presented in conjunction with “She Who Tells a Story,” will showcase seven recent purchases, including calligraphic manuscripts, textiles, metalwork and an architectural fragment all dating from the 8th century CE to the 17th century. It opens on Friday, September 13; there will be one rotation of the textiles and Qur’anic manuscripts on Friday, November 22, midway through the show.

Exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Click on the arrow above to hear about the exhibition.

Click HERE to read the press release.

Click HERE to listen to artist Rania Matar’s interview on The State of Things.

SHE WHO TELLS A STORY Public programs

Family Weekend: Start with Art Breakfast & Tour of She Who Tells a Story
21 September 2019 | 8:30 – 10:00 AM

2nd Friday ArtWalk
Through Her Lens: Modern Arab Women Telling Their Stories in Art and Literature
11 October 2019 | 6:30-8 PM

Featuring the 2019 Man Booker Prize-winner Celestial Bodies by Jokha Alharthi (translator Marilyn Booth). Cohosted by Carolina Public Humanities.
Advance ticket required. Ticket price includes a copy of the book and light refreshments at the program.

Artist Talk: Rania Matar
23 October 2019 | 7 PM

Free and open to the public; RSVP requested.

Family & Friends Sunday
27 October 2019 | 2-5 PM

2nd Friday ArtWalk
Pop-Up Artist Books Show from the Sloane Art Library
8 November 2019 | 6-8:30 PM

SHe Who Tells A Story Guided Tours

Free, drop-in tour of She Who Tells A Story, led by an Ackland docent

October 2, 2019 | 1:30 PM
October 25, 2019 | 1:30 PM
October 30, 2019 | 1:30 PM
November 13, 2019 | 1:30 PM
November 15, 2019 | 1:30 PM
November 20, 2019 | 1:30 PM
November 21, 2019 | 1:30 PM
November 22, 2019 | 1:30 PM
November 27, 2019 | 1:30 PM
November 29, 2019 | 1:30 PM

Last Look Tour with Peter Nisbet
December 1, 2019 | 3:30 PM

Ackland Film Forum

Ackland Film Forum: Recent Films by Arab Women Filmmakers
Tuesdays, Oct 29, Nov 5, Nov 12, Nov 19 | 7 PM at the Varsity Theatre

DATES

October 29, 2019: The Blessed
Dir. Sofia Djama, Qatar, 2017

November 5, 2019: Mussolini’s Sister
Dir. Juna Suleiman, Palestine, 2018
Introductory Remarks by Yaron Shemer (Asian Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill)

November 12, 2019: Women Without Men
Dir. Shirin Neshat, Iran, 2009
Introductory Remarks by Ehsan Sheikholharam (Religious Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill)

November 19, 2019: 3000 Nights
Mai Masri, Palestine, 2016
Introductory Remarks by Nadia Yaqub (Asian Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill)

TICKETS

$7; Free with UNC One Card
Tickets available at the Varsity Theatre, 123 E. Franklin St.

ABOUT THE SERIES

The Ackland Film Forum’s Fall 2019 series Recent Films by Arab Women Filmmakers is organized by the UNC Department of Asian Studies, the UNC Global Cinema Studies program in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, and the Ackland Art Museum. The series is presented in connection with the Ackland’s current exhibition She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World (on view through December 1, 2019). The exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


Image credit: Gohar Dashti (b. 1980). Untitled #5. From the series Today’s Life and War, 2008. Pigment print. Courtesy of the artist, Azita Bina and Robert Klein Gallery, Boston. Used with artist’s permission.

Way Out West: Celebrating the Gift of the Hugh A. McAllister Jr. Collection

Way Out West: Celebrating the Gift of the Hugh A. McAllister Jr. Collection marks the transformational bequest of over twenty examples of art related to the American West and Southwest to the Ackland Art Museum. Displayed together with artworks already in the Museum’s own permanent collection, the exhibition features nearly eighty works spanning over 150 years, by artists such as Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, Ansel Adams, Awa Tsireh, Dorothea Lange, Edward Weston, and Allan Houser, among others, that chart how artists have responded to the landscape and culture of the American West since the late nineteenth century. Exceptional paintings, prints, photographs, sculpture and decorative art are displayed thematically, with a special section devoted to the collector, his taste, and his understanding of the role of art in our daily lives.

Way Out West: Celebrating the Gift of the Hugh A. McAllister Jr. Collection has been made possible by UNC Medicine in honor of Hugh A. McAllister Jr.

Click ABOVE to hear the exhibition announcement on WCHL Chapelboro.com. Click HERE to download press release.

Way Out West Public Programs 

2nd Friday ArtWalk: Curator’s Keynote
14 June 2019 | 6:00 PM

An illustrated introduction to Way Out West by its curator Dana Cowen, Sheldon Peck Curator for European and American Art before 1950. RSVP HERE!

The galleries will remain open until 9 PM for the Museum’s monthly 2nd Friday ArtWalk evening hours.

Music in the Galleries: Ryan Dial-Stanley
16 June 2019 | 2-3 PM

Ryan Dial-Stanley, a member of the Lumbee Tribe, is a well-known flutist, performing artist, and educator. Mr. Dial-Stanley is currently a student in the UNC School of Medicine majoring in Clinical Lab Science. He has traveled across the state of North Carolina presenting programs on the history and culture of the Lumbee Tribe. He is also the co-chair of the Carolina Indian Circle and President of Phi Sigma Nu, the first Native American Fraternity.

Free, seating is first come first served.

Family and Friends Sunday: Cartography
23 June 2019 | 2-5 PM

Learn about how maps served the artists of Way Out West.

  • Listen to stories about exploration chosen by Chapel Hill Public Library children’s librarians
  • See maps of the U.S. and meet cartography expert Renée Bosman from UNC Libraries
  • Watch the first of three selections from PBS’ National Parks documentary series to glimpse some of the natural wonders featured in the works of Way Out West
  • Enjoy exploring the art on view with a themed scavenger hunt and hands-on art-making activities for all ages

Free and open to the public.

Guided Tour: Way Out West
28 June | 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

Guided Tour: Way Out West
5 July| 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

2nd Friday ArtWalk
12 July 2019 | Open ’til 9 PM

Experience Way Out West after hours during the Chapel Hill-Carrboro 2nd Friday ArtWalk.

  • 6-8:30 PM | Art Library Pop Up @ the Ackland
    View rare and unique items from the Sloane Art Library’s special collections relating to themes in Way Out West

Free and open to the public.

Art Adventures: “Painting” the Landscape with Pastels
13 July 2019 | 10:30 AM, 1:00 PM, 3:00 PM 
$5 per child; free for members at the Household level and above. RSVP by selecting the session time above!

Guided Tour: Way Out West
18 July | 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

A Reader’s Guide to Way Out West
21 July | 2 PM

From Louis L’Amour to Cormac McCarthy, the American West has inspired writers and captivated readers, including Chapel Hill Public Library Director Susan Brown. She has wandered through the exhibition and in this lively talk, she will share suggestions for books that pair well with Way Out West (and she will most likely work in a movie recommendation or two as well). The result will be a westward expansion of your TBR pile! Free and open to the public.

Missed the talk? Find the books at the Chapel Hill Public Library!

Guided Tour: Way Out West
24 July | 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

Family and Friends Sunday: The Great Outdoors
28 July 2019 | 2-5 PM

Consider the physicality of creating art featuring mountains, cliffs, and canyons.

  • Learn about rock climbing in our courtyard with Triangle Rock Club Durham
  • Learn how art and nature intersect and inspire at North Carolina State Parks with Anjanée N. Bell, Director of Arts in the Parks
  • Hear from Johnny Randall, the NCBG Director of Conservation.
  • Catch the next selection of our PBS National Parks screenings in ART&.
  • Enjoy exploring the art on view with a themed scavenger hunt and hands-on art-making activities for all ages

Free and open to the public.

Guided Tour: Way Out West
1 August | 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

“The Way Out West: Desert Landscapes” Artist Talk by Michelle Van Parys
1 August | 6:00 PM

RSVP HERE for the Talk!

Guided Tour: Way Out West
8 August | 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

2nd Friday ArtWalk
9 August 2019 | Open ’til 9 PM

Panel: Perspectives on Way Out West
9 August 2019 | 6 PM

  • Elizabeth Broun, Director Emerita of the Smithsonian American Art Museum
  • John Coffey, Deputy Director for Art and Jim and Betty Becher Curator of American and Modern Art at the North Carolina Museum of Art
  • Dana Cowen, Sheldon Peck Curator for European and American Art before 1950 at the Ackland Art Museum

RSVP HERE for the Panel!

How the West Was Told: An Evening of Art and Literature at the Ackland
9 August 2019 | 7 PM

Register for a book discussion program with Carolina Public Humanities that pairs Way Out West with Leslie Marmon Silko’s The Storyteller. The discussion of the book and a look at the art will be facilitated by UNC lecturer Jennifer Howard and Ackland Director of Academic Programs Carolyn Allmendinger.

$38 per person (includes a copy of the book, light refreshments, and a reserved seat at the Panel: Perspectives on Way Out West). RSVP required; REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN! Register HERE!

Art Adventures: Way Out Weaving
10 August 2019 | 10:30 AM, 1:00 PM, 3:00 PM

$5 per child; free for members at the Household level and above. RSVP by selecting the session time above!

Guided Tour: Way Out West
16 August
| 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

Music in the Galleries: Brian and Mary Lewis
18 August 2019 | 2-3 PM
Vintage Country Music by Brian and Mary Lewis, with Nancy Bierman (bass)

Free, seating is first come first served.

Guided Tour: Way Out West
21 August| 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

Guided Tour: Way Out West
22 August | 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

Guided Tour: Way Out West
23 August | 1:30 PM
Free, drop-in tour of Way Out West, led by an Ackland docent

Family and Friends Sunday: Protecting Our Environment
25 August 2019 | 2-5 PM

On the final day of Way Out West explore the natural environments depicted with an eye towards protecting them for the future.

  • Meet Alan Weakly, the Director of Herbarium at the North Carolina Botanical Garden, to learn about North Carolina’s native plants.
  • Watch the last selection from PBS National Parks in ART&
  • At 3:30 PM, join Way Out West curator Dana Cowen for a Last Look Tour.
  • Enjoy exploring the art on view with a themed scavenger hunt and hands-on art-making activities for all ages

Free and open to the public.

Last Look Tour
25 August 2019 | 3:30 PM

Last Look Tour led by exhibition curator Dana Cowen, Sheldon Peck Curator for European and American Art before 1950. Free, no RSVP needed.


Image credit: Thomas Moran, American, born in England, 1837-1926: Virgin River, Utah (detail), 1908,oil on canvas, 20 x 30 in. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The Hugh A. McAllister, Jr., M.D. Collection, 2019.15.22.

ART& Stacey L. Kirby: The Department of Reflection

INSTALLATION | PERFORMANCES | BIOGRAPHY | PRESS RELEASE

In this site-specific commission, Stacey L. Kirby presents The Department of Reflection, a multimedia installation that reflects on the ways in which government, citizenry, and labor issues intersect in contemporary society. Kirby has festooned an office environment with bunting created from screen-printed emergency thermal mylar blankets.

The reflective mylar material works in two ways. First, its reflective surface enables her mimicry of patriotic decoration to physically mirror its surroundings, rather than to prescribe the traditional symbolic values of red, white, and blue. And second, the blankets’ association with the handling of transient populations after being captured (say, at the border between the United States and Mexico) or rescued (say, in the Mediterranean after failed refugee sea crossings) evokes a strong sense of imminent crisis within the installation, demonstrated especially through the readily available wearable blankets installed on hooks.

This anxiety is heightened by the signage that explains that The Department of Reflection is on furlough. While furloughs immediately impact affected employees (and the installation underscores the multitude of systems already restricting labor), they can quickly ripple throughout society. An utterly non-functional government office is perhaps even more worrying than the wry parodies of dysfunctional bureaucratic procedures that Kirby’s other works have enacted within specially designed office-like spaces. Audiences may recall her performative interactions The Bureau of Personal Belonging (ArtPrize Eight, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2016) and The Power of the Ballot (Nasher Museum of Art, Durham, North Carolina, 2015). Without artist-trained intermediaries to lead visitors through The Department of Reflection, this particular installation demands that viewers individually ruminate on the questions that it raises.

There will be a brief break in the furlough on Friday, April 12, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., when Kirby and community members will conduct Civil Presence assessments. The assessments are free and open to the public, and they will be conducted on a rolling basis. No advance registration is required. Following this performance, an edited video will document some of those Civil Presence interactions on a monitor in ART&.

A final performance will take place on Sunday, August 4, from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. Members of the general public can participate in Civil Presence assessments conducted by Kirby and her team on the final afternoon of the installation. Free and open to the public; no registration needed.

Durham-based Stacey L. Kirby, an alumna of UNC-Chapel Hill, received the ArtPrize Eight Juried Grand Prize (2016) and the North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship for Visual Artists (2014-15). She was a nominee for the Anonymous Was A Woman Award and a finalist for the 1858 Prize by the Gibbes Museum of Art (Charleston, South Carolina). Kirby has attended artist residencies throughout the United States, including the Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausalito, California), the Atlantic Center for the Arts (New Smyrna Beach, Florida) and Artspace (Raleigh, North Carolina).

Click HERE to read the press release.

Stacey L. Kirby, American: The Department of Reflection, 2019, site-specific multimedia installation.

Photo credit: Alex Maness Photography